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View Full Version : Education: Is Ron Paul Hypcrotical About Public Education?




GopBlackList
02-27-2012, 09:00 PM
Didn't Ron Paul attend public school, which helped him get to college? and didn't Thomas Jefferson support the idea of public schools:
http://youtu.be/-IvPQCHcIpI

RDM
02-27-2012, 09:08 PM
He sure did. When he attended there was no Department of Education. Back then schools were either funded by the states, counties or localities by way of taxes and not the Federal government. That's Ron's policy now on education, having it revert back to the states, hence end the Department of Education. No hypocrisy here.

playboymommy
02-27-2012, 09:23 PM
Didn't Ron Paul attend public school
http://youtu.be/-IvPQCHcIpI

He did. I had the pleasure of speaking to him on the phone in January of 08. My aunt is a teacher in TX, took her students to DC, knowing how much I love the good Doctor promised if they got to meet him she would ask him to call me and he did. :)

We spoke about Pittsburgh and he said his high school was great but is no longer around. Then he had to go but I thanked him for lighting the fire of liberty in our hearts. Here is an article written in our local paper about how successful Ron was even in high school.

Ron Paul's roots stem to Green Tree, Dormont
He was voted 'best all-around' at Dormont High School
Sunday, October 23, 2011
By Kaitlynn Riely, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Ron Paul

Ron Paul is a Republican candidate for president, a congressman from Texas, a staunch conservative known for his advocacy of limited government, low taxes and free markets, and a doctor who has delivered more than 4,000 babies.

That much is widely known about Mr. Paul, who is making his third run for the American presidency.

A lesser known aspect of his biography is that in 1953, his classmates at Dormont High School, where he was president of the student council and a track star, voted him "best all-around." The Dormont Historical Society still has the yearbook to prove it.

It is a long tradition in American politics for presidential candidates to share their life stories with the electorate. Voters knew Mr. Clinton was the man from Hope. George W. Bush asserted his Texas heritage. Barack Obama wrote two books about his life story and outlook, and in the ongoing race for the Republican nomination in 2012, several candidates have made their upbringing and background a prime feature of their campaigns.

For Ron Paul, life began in Green Tree, a small community southwest of the city of Pittsburgh, and later Dormont, another small borough south of the city, where he attended high school.

"Their life story always makes some sort of implicit argument about what they are going to stand for and what they represent," said Michael Hogan, director of the Center for Democratic Deliberation at Penn State University.

Mr. Paul has introduced voters to the Pittsburgh-based aspects of his life story on his website and in campaign literature. Born in 1935, he was the third of five sons of Margaret and Howard Paul. He worked on the Green Tree Dairy, his family's farm, won the Pennsylvania state championship in the 220-yard dash and graduated from Dormont High School in 1953.

He went on to Gettysburg College and Duke University School of Medicine, married Carol Wells, another Dormont High School graduate, and did his medical residency at Magee-Womens Hospital in Oakland before moving to Texas.

Yet as his political career has progressed, Mr. Paul has cast himself more as a man of ideas than a particular kind of personality, Mr. Hogan said. And that's why, even in the Pittsburgh region, more people would identify Mr. Paul for his commitment to libertarian ideals than for his upbringing in Green Tree.

But although Mr. Paul left the South Hills of Pittsburgh long ago for Texas, Congress and now a national campaign that had him unveiling his economic plan in Las Vegas last week, there are still some here who remember Mr. Paul as Green Tree's native son.

"People mention it. We always make sure to order any books about him or by him, and they do get checked out," said Adaena Tray, the director of the Green Tree Public Library.

And as Mr. Paul won congressional elections, ran for president on the Libertarian ticket in 1988 and then the Republican ticket in 2008, Marilyn Albitz, president of the Green Tree Historical Society, has been steadily tracking his career, saving articles she finds and others send her about Mr. Paul.

"Everything I find I cut out," she said. "We've got quite a thick file on him."

There's another thick file on Mr. Paul's accomplishments filed at the Dormont Historical Society, as well as a "Ron Paul 2008" campaign poster, a milk carton from the Green Tree Dairy where Mr. Paul and his brothers worked, a quarter with Ron Paul's image on it and a picture of Mr. Paul and his wife on a poster of married couples who met as students at Dormont High School.

Dormont High School was replaced by Keystone Oaks High School in the 1960s, but the Dormont Historical Society still keeps a shelf filled with Dormont High yearbooks.

In the 1953 yearbook, a young Ron Paul describes his pet peeve as "stuck up girls," his pastime as "keeping up with sports" and his ambition "to go to college."

His classmates voted Mr. Paul and a female classmate, Marlene Santomo, as "best all-around."

Marlene Santomo, now Ms. Holmes-Dunn, still lives in Dormont and works as a financial adviser. She never heard her former classmate discussing any of the political or policy views he holds today, but remembers him as well liked and friendly to everyone.

"I have always thought very highly of Ron," she said. "He did come to a couple of our class reunions when he was a [congressman] and actually, everyone thought very highly of Ron. The more and more I read about him right now, I think he has wonderful ideas, and I wish he was getting more attention."

Ms. Holmes-Dunn's complaint is a common one voiced by Paul supporters, who point to his strong grass roots support, his second-place finish in the Iowa straw poll and his consistent presence near the top of presidential polls as reasons the media and voters should give his campaign more attention.

Yet, even in his hometown, Mr. Paul has been overshadowed by the wide field of Republican contenders for president.

"My sense is that Ron Paul does not have as much support in Pittsburgh as he did the last time he ran," said Jim Roddey, chairman of the Republican Committee of Allegheny County. "The reason is that the last time, he was really the only person who was identified as being pretty far to the right."

But in this election, there are several candidates that fit that mold, he said.

Even in Green Tree, said Adele Bonassi, chair of the Green Tree Republican Party, there doesn't seem to be a huge swelling of support for Mr. Paul.

But she thinks his candidacy, and the fact that he is from her town, is a good thing.

"I think it says something for the community," she said. "We must have done something right."

13121313

And what RDM said... + rep.

RDM
02-27-2012, 09:45 PM
About Pittsburgh press coverage today, it's very scant coverage at best and once in a blue moon, him being mentioned as being from Pittsburgh.

tttppp
02-27-2012, 09:53 PM
Didn't Ron Paul attend public school, which helped him get to college? and didn't Thomas Jefferson support the idea of public schools:
http://youtu.be/-IvPQCHcIpI

I attended public school too. That doesn't mean I can't be critical of them.

playboymommy
02-27-2012, 10:43 PM
About Pittsburgh press coverage today, it's very scant coverage at best and once in a blue moon, him being mentioned as being from Pittsburgh.

Really our local coverage of him is a disgrace. The man hails from here, you'd think the locals would be more proud.

Shane Harris
02-27-2012, 10:55 PM
Really our local coverage of him is a disgrace. The man hails from here, you'd think the locals would be more proud.

agreed. most people I talk to don't even know he's from here (Pittsburgh area). He never brings it up. Typical Ron haha

Feeding the Abscess
02-27-2012, 11:18 PM
How is he a hypocrite? He never even called for the abolition of public schools when he ran on the libertarian ticket in 1988. He's called for competition in schools, with no impediments in any fashion to private or homeschooling, with no coercion or impulsion to attend or support public schools.

rpwi
03-03-2012, 09:34 AM
Believe Paul's presidential stance is actually strictly one of states rights. To him education should be in the domain exclusively of the states...and it will be up to them to reform their system. To get his opinion as to whether schools should have public funding is somewhat irrelevant. It would be like asking a UN official what he felt about public funding of education...to which a proper answer would that it wasn't relevant for his position. If a state wanted to double public spending on education, I doubt a President Paul would use his authority to oppose this.

If Paul were running for a state government position, I'm sure he would favor ending public funding of education...but I suspect he would create a transition mechanism.

Liberty74
03-03-2012, 09:53 AM
Ron doesn't support public schools? That is simply not true.

He does not believe in federalizing public schools at the national level. Plus he believes "the money" spent on a child should go with that child. Meaning, Ron supports choice. If you send your kid(s) to private or where ever, that money goes with the kid. The public school system and the union thugs are not entitled.

It's a pretty simple philosophy.

acptulsa
03-03-2012, 09:57 AM
Believe Paul's presidential stance is actually strictly one of states rights.

Furthermore, the presidency is a federal office. Which affects federal bureaucracies. And in addition, I don't believe your local public school system is federal, but rather local. Hence the name.

And if you'll look at the Ninth and Tenth Amendments, Mr. Blacklist, and research Dr. Paul's position on both, I believe you'll discover that he would never interfere with your local functions at all.

Beats No Child Left Behind--without getting their whole school left behind with them.