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roridude
02-27-2012, 10:03 AM
I'm Sam from the County of Kent in England. As you can probably imagine, the traditional media outlets do not talk much about Ron Paul's tremendous success story and the revolution. I found out about Ron Paul and his ideas after I started reading about Friedman's economic ideas and branched out and researched topics like Ludvig Von Mises, Ayn Rand etc. I now seem to follow American news more than British news!

In my spare time I write for an economics news/comment website and I've written a piece about the 'Ron Paul Revolution- - I was wondering if there there is a sub-forum that I could post in about that? Basically I'm just keen to see what ideas people generally have about this. The main jist of the article is looking at the success of Ron Paul and emphasising that if someone whose philosophy is so different from that of traditional main-stream politics can be successful in the US, then perhaps the same can happen in the UK, we really need some fresh ideas to get us out of European Socialism!!

Really looking forward to engaging with the community in the future and being a small part in this changing world.

Sam.

Pennsylvania
02-27-2012, 10:05 AM
Great to have you!

bolil
02-27-2012, 10:06 AM
Indeed, welcome.

tommyzDad
02-27-2012, 10:17 AM
Welcome aboard!

BuddyRey
02-27-2012, 11:39 AM
Welcome to the forums, Sam!

I find nothing more thrilling and exciting than encountering Ron Paul supporters from outside the U.S. And from what I understand, they're increasingly easy to find.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 11:40 AM
Welcome, fellow Brit :D

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 11:57 AM
Welcome.

The reason Britain doesn't have a Ron Paul is that the party leaders pre-select all MP candidates. No independent thinker is allowed to run for a major party. Even the few so-called primaries have only offered party members a choice among pre-selected candidates. Until genuine community-level selection is possible, there is no hope for Britain.

BuddyRey
02-27-2012, 12:01 PM
Welcome.

The reason Britain doesn't have a Ron Paul is that the party leaders pre-select all MP candidates. No independent thinker is allowed to run for a major party. Even the few so-called primaries have only offered party members a choice among pre-selected candidates. Until genuine community-level selection is possible, there is no hope for Britain.

I wonder how Daniel Hannan managed to slip in there. Whoever's in charge of keeping fiscal conservatives out of Parliament must have been on coffee break.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 12:05 PM
Welcome.

The reason Britain doesn't have a Ron Paul is that the party leaders pre-select all MP candidates. No independent thinker is allowed to run for a major party. Even the few so-called primaries have only offered party members a choice among pre-selected candidates. Until genuine community-level selection is possible, there is no hope for Britain.

Or work with the party, run for council, get elected and keep yourself high profile and politically clean. Being <40 helps. And female. Work with the MP if they are from your party or publicly oppose the PM if in opposing party. If the PM is in your party, wait for them to stop down. From your contacts developed after working with him/her, you can put yourself in the running for the party slot. For my constituency, it's extremely easy to meet the MP and spend a few hours with him every two weeks while he goes door knocking. He's also widely considered to be in the running for the leadership position of the conservative party after Cameron is out.

Or wait for a wedge issue (as there is in my constituency right now), make a name for yourself supporting/opposing it, and run as an independent or UKIP candidate.

The national wedge issue is the EU, and both major parties are in favor of remaining with the EU. This gives a huge opening for the UKIP to gain some seats, especially in the north.

British politics isn't really all that closed off since the huge majority of people are uninterested in lower elections, it's relatively easy to win lower office under a major party banner.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 12:11 PM
I wonder how Daniel Hannan managed to slip in there. Whoever's in charge of keeping fiscal conservatives out of Parliament must have been on coffee break.

He was involved in the political side of things when he was at Oxford, the Oxford University Conservative Association specifically. People who are members of that generally go on to become heavily involved in the party. He was President of the OUCA, which is a huge position. Margaret Thatcher was also a past President.

He then worked with the party and worked in the right wing media. He got to know the right people and was selected as a name for the EU parliament elections. Since EU parliament seats are allocated proportionately based on the popular vote, it was relatively easy for him to win the seat in the conservative South East.

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 12:44 PM
Or wait for a wedge issue (as there is in my constituency right now), make a name for yourself supporting/opposing it, and run as an independent or UKIP candidate.

The national wedge issue is the EU, and both major parties are in favor of remaining with the EU. This gives a huge opening for the UKIP to gain some seats, especially in the north.

UKIP doesn't have a single MP seat and has zero prospect of obtaining one, as far as I can tell. They were trounced in the recent by-election. Unfortunately, except for their MEPs they have no claim to be called a major party.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 12:53 PM
UKIP doesn't have a single MP seat and has zero prospect of obtaining one, as far as I can tell. They were trounced in the recent by-election. Unfortunately, except for their MEPs they have no claim to be called a major party.

Wedge issues without representation for one side of the argument CREATE major parties. Daniel Hannan is a wet dream yet is off in distant lands.

Now, I didn't call them a major party, but that doesn't rule it out, especially with the way the EU is heading. My idea of the new "major party" is four smaller ones. Lib Dems stealing a few seats from the bigger Labour party and the UKIP stealing a few from the conservatives.

The argument of hopelessness discourages political activity for so many in the UK. The truth is, politics is easy compared to the US. With what Ron Paul has accomplished, don't rule out something good happening in the UK :D.

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 12:54 PM
Or work with the party, run for council, get elected and keep yourself high profile and politically clean. Being <40 helps. And female. Work with the MP if they are from your party or publicly oppose the PM if in opposing party. If the PM is in your party, wait for them to stop down. From your contacts developed after working with him/her, you can put yourself in the running for the party slot. For my constituency, it's extremely easy to meet the MP and spend a few hours with him every two weeks while he goes door knocking. He's also widely considered to be in the running for the leadership position of the conservative party after Cameron is out.

...

British politics isn't really all that closed off since the huge majority of people are uninterested in lower elections, it's relatively easy to win lower office under a major party banner.

How many MPs were previously on their local council? I had the impression that most were former research assistants or other London types.

Does 'keep politically clean' mean 'no corruption'? Or does it mean 'no dissenting views'?

bluesc
02-27-2012, 01:03 PM
How many MPs were previously on their local council? I had the impression that most were former research assistants or other London types.

Notice elsewhere where I mentioned joining the MP when they are in the constituency? My MP offers internships to young conservatives.

What I was talking about overall is becoming involved in the party. If you become heavily involved in the local party, it is much easier to work your way up and get to know the higher ups. You are correct that working in Westminster is a good way - only because you get to know the party leaders and typically the MP for the constituency you plan to run for.

My MP was a donor to the party, worked with the party and chaired a charity (all good ways to be selected).


Does 'keep politically clean' mean 'no corruption'? Or does it mean 'no dissenting views'?

1) Very few dissenting views
2) No controversy

Candidates are highly vetted.

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 01:07 PM
Wedge issues without representation for one side of the argument CREATE major parties. Daniel Hannan is a wet dream yet is off in distant lands.

Now, I didn't call them a major party, but that doesn't rule it out, especially with the way the EU is heading. My idea of the new "major party" is four smaller ones. Lib Dems stealing a few seats from the bigger Labour party and the UKIP stealing a few from the conservatives.

The argument of hopelessness discourages political activity for so many in the UK. The truth is, politics is easy compared to the US. With what Ron Paul has accomplished, don't rule out something good happening in the UK :D.

But the EU wedge issue has been around for 20 years and UKIP still hasn't won a single MP. I'd love to see them succeed; I'm just doubtful.

I like your optimism though. When will you run for office? (Are you in Osborne's constituency?)

Edit: Actually, you'd better not say...I wouldn't want you to be 'outed' as a Ron Paul
Supporter.. It might hurt your chances...

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 01:14 PM
1) Very few dissenting views
2) No controversy

Candidates are highly vetted.

This is my point. The GOP has hated Ron Paul from the beginning. The leadership has recruited Democrats to switch parties and run against him in the primaries. The national leadership has flown in big-wigs to oppose him, and solicited donations for his opponents. There is no way he would have been selected to run by party leaders in tbe UK. And even if he had slipped through, they would have 'deselected' him at the next election and prevented him from running for re-election.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 01:23 PM
But the EU wedge issue has been around for 20 years and UKIP still hasn't won a single MP. I'd love to see them succeed; I'm just doubtful.

I like your optimism though. When will you run for office? (Are you in Osborne's constituency?)

My optimism comes from the EU situation getting worse and if the Eurosceptics don't gain power in the Conservative party, the UKIP WILL be there.

Not Osborne. Grant Shapps. We'll see where he goes :D

Unless an easy seat opens up after I'm done with my studies, I won't be running for any form of office, or at least I have absolutely no plans to.

bluesc
02-27-2012, 01:28 PM
This is my point. The GOP has hated Ron Paul from the beginning. The leadership has recruited Democrats to switch parties and run against him in the primaries. The national leadership has flown in big-wigs to oppose him, and solicited donations for his opponents. There is no way he would have been selected to run by party leaders in tbe UK. And even if he had slipped through, they would have 'deselected' him at the next election and prevented him from running for re-election.

The GOP establishment may hate Paul and all of his supporters, but his supporters now control the Iowa GOP and the Nevada GOP. I vice chaired the volunteer effort for a local council election and I'm relatively young. I also have been offered a good role in the local conservative future (youth wing) organization. When I'm done with my studies I could probably have much heavier involvement. That's why it's easier here. Youth involvement is abysmal. The UK conservatives do everything to encourage party growth, which is what the GOP never does.

Paul Fan
02-27-2012, 02:07 PM
The GOP establishment may hate Paul and all of his supporters, but his supporters now control the Iowa GOP and the Nevada GOP. I vice chaired the volunteer effort for a local council election and I'm relatively young. I also have been offered a good role in the local conservative future (youth wing) organization. When I'm done with my studies I could probably have much heavier involvement. That's why it's easier here. Youth involvement is abysmal. The UK conservatives do everything to encourage party growth, which is what the GOP never does.

That is good to hear. I hope you stay involved and have a good influence in your party! Have you ever expressed your 'Paulian' views publically? The UK conservatives, and Conservative Future, seem to be entirely big-state warmongering neocons as far as I can tell. Do you ever encounter any who support a more Paulian approach?