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ShaneEnochs
01-30-2012, 08:39 PM
I hear Ron say all the time that when he was practicing medicine way back when, there was no government interference and so health care was affordable. It got me thinking: what would be considered affordable health care today? I recently went to the doctor to get a sinus infection checked out, and my bill was $400. I do NOT consider this affordable at all. If government got out of the way, would perhaps a $50 bill be possible?

Travlyr
01-30-2012, 08:42 PM
I use an older doctor in a small mid-west town for $25 office visit. He is very busy, quite good, and well off. If the medical markets were truly free, then that would be much more common.

ryanmkeisling
01-30-2012, 08:51 PM
I hear Ron say all the time that when he was practicing medicine way back when, there was no government interference and so health care was affordable. It got me thinking: what would be considered affordable health care today? I recently went to the doctor to get a sinus infection checked out, and my bill was $400. I do NOT consider this affordable at all. If government got out of the way, would perhaps a $50 bill be possible?

As a diabetic a cheap appointment for me is $250/month(this is with a generous earnings discount, $600 otherwise.) 20 years ago it would have been $35/month(no discount.)

tttppp
01-30-2012, 09:08 PM
I hear Ron say all the time that when he was practicing medicine way back when, there was no government interference and so health care was affordable. It got me thinking: what would be considered affordable health care today? I recently went to the doctor to get a sinus infection checked out, and my bill was $400. I do NOT consider this affordable at all. If government got out of the way, would perhaps a $50 bill be possible?

Usually $50-$150 is fair. If you tell them you don't have insurance they usually give you a discount and many times you pay less than you would if you did have insurance (this is if you go to a private practice). Insurance is a total fraud. The real scam comes if you go to the hospital. You can spend only 15 minutes with a doctor, have no tests done, and be billed for thousands of dollars if you don't have insurance. Not to mention, they are so incompetent they'll send you different bills from different departments so its impossible to know if you've payed them off.

For a sinus infection, I'm sure $50-150 is more than fair. I'm sure they spent less than 1 hour with you, so $50-150/hr is more than fair.

Acala
01-31-2012, 09:29 AM
In a free market, it is very unlikely that you would need to see a full md for something as simple as a sinus infection. Most routine doctor visits could easily be handled by people with far less education than an md. And that means far lower cost.

KCIndy
01-31-2012, 09:57 AM
It got me thinking: what would be considered affordable health care today? I recently went to the doctor to get a sinus infection checked out, and my bill was $400. I do NOT consider this affordable at all. If government got out of the way, would perhaps a $50 bill be possible?


If there were NO government interference, you wouldn't even necessarily have to go to the doctor to treat a sinus infection. If you know you've got a sinus infection, you ought to be able to go to the store and buy some generic antibiotics for less than ten bucks.

Zippyjuan
01-31-2012, 12:32 PM
If there were NO government interference, you wouldn't even necessarily have to go to the doctor to treat a sinus infection. If you know you've got a sinus infection, you ought to be able to go to the store and buy some generic antibiotics for less than ten bucks.

A potential problem with cheap and unlimited access to antibiotics would be their mis-use or over- use which would increase the number of antiboitic resistant viruses.

Icymudpuppy
01-31-2012, 12:41 PM
I have a local clinic that is usually $60/visit for normal things like colds/flu, strep, minor injuries, and the like.

Icymudpuppy
01-31-2012, 12:43 PM
A potential problem with cheap and unlimited access to antibiotics would be their mis-use or over- use which would increase the number of antiboitic resistant viruses.

Manufacturers of antibiotics would not want to release their product to the general public because they know that improper use makes their product less effective and forces the development of new product. They are happier to just manufacture the same product for as long as possible. Thus, they will only sell to doctors and pharmacies that manage proper use.

KCIndy
01-31-2012, 01:07 PM
A potential problem with cheap and unlimited access to antibiotics would be their mis-use or over- use which would increase the number of antiboitic resistant viruses.


I'm assuming you mean bacteria, not viruses, since antibiotics only work against bacteria.

And yeah, I'm very familiar with the dangerous of improper use. But do you know that in a lot of countries you can buy a lot of different medications (including antibiotics) over the counter, rather than with a prescription?

Liberty74
01-31-2012, 01:23 PM
Govt programs and regulations have added about 50% to the cost of health care from what I have read.

GrahamUK
01-31-2012, 01:24 PM
I hear Ron say all the time that when he was practicing medicine way back when, there was no government interference and so health care was affordable. It got me thinking: what would be considered affordable health care today? I recently went to the doctor to get a sinus infection checked out, and my bill was $400. I do NOT consider this affordable at all. If government got out of the way, would perhaps a $50 bill be possible?

Holy dog shit!! Is that the standard costs of seeing a doctor for trivial complaints ? .... That seems crazy to me(plz note i live in Socialist Britain)

Zippyjuan
01-31-2012, 02:21 PM
Govt programs and regulations have added about 50% to the cost of health care from what I have read.

Competition in insurance has added lots of costs to medical care in the US. More companies and more different policies with different coverages and paperwork requirements means tons of more paperwork that providers have to do. Each application for payment the facility has to file must be handled individually to be sure that the proper forms and information are provided in the proper manner to the proper place. Any errors and they get sent back and forth over and over. When everybody paid in cash, you didn't have to deal with this problem. Administration overhead is one source of higher costs of medicine in the US.
http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/21/why-does-us-health-care-cost-so-much-part-ii-indefensible-administrative-costs/

Two studies using more detailed bilateral comparisons of two countries illustrate even more sharply the magnitude of our administrative burden relative to that in other developed countries.

One of these is an earlier McKinsey study explaining the difference in 1990 health spending in West Germany and in the United States. The researchers found that in 1990 Americans received $390 per capita less in actual health care but spent $360 more per capita on administration.

A second, more recent study of administrative costs in the American and Canadian health systems was published in 2003 by Steffie Woolhandler and David Himmelstein in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2003. The study used a measure of administrative costs that includes not only the insurer’s costs, but also the costs borne by employers, health-care providers and governments – but not the value of the time patients spent claiming reimbursement. These authors estimated that in 1999, Americans spent $1,059 per capita on administration compared with only $307 in purchasing power parity dollars (PPP $) spent in Canada.

AcousticFoodie
01-31-2012, 02:34 PM
In a free market, it is very unlikely that you would need to see a full md for something as simple as a sinus infection. Most routine doctor visits could easily be handled by people with far less education than an md. And that means far lower cost.

I'm assuming you mean a Nurse practitioner or physician assistant. Problem is, the American Medical Association is a powerful enough lobby that they can try to use legislation to stop this if NPs or PAs start taking too many patients away from them.

What do you guys think of this plan?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEi0OveTtO8&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL7444C1102FAE58D7