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View Full Version : Muslims say Ron Paul is their kind of Republican




presence
01-17-2012, 08:12 PM
"“These laws are obviously directed at policing Muslims,” Siddiqui said. “Ron Paul knows how to differentiate between Muslims and terrorists, and he would never sacrifice any citizen’s liberties over security.”"

By Omar Sacirbey| Religion News Service, Updated: Tuesday, January 17, 4:40 PM

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-faith/muslims-say-ron-paul-is-their-kind-of-republican/2012/01/17/gIQA9oqH6P_story.html?tid=pm_national_pop

"After abandoning the GOP in droves during the George W. Bush presidency, some Muslims say Paul is the kind of Republican who could draw them back and seriously challenge their loyalty to President Obama."

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From what I understand of Muslim politics... THEY WANT TO BLOC VOTE. Especially in this election. Sure they are a small % of the electorate... but their leadership strongly wishes to vote by block.... and time and again they're leaning Paul.

The Art of Wooing Muslims:

"They vote in larger proportions and participate more in politics, much more than the rest of the electorate. They vote ‘en bloc’ for one candidate or party. Muslim voters are more ‘strategic’ in their voting and tend to hold back their decisions until the last moment.
They are more dependent on others in their decision making and more likely to be influenced by clerics or community leaders and guided more by narrow community issues rather than by broader collective or national interests. In many Muslim-dominated areas, they do not have individual opinion and cast their votes as per the fatwa of their religious leaders. "
[]

"The above characteristics make Muslims an extraordinary political community easy to maneuver in elections."

http://islam-watch.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=742:the-art-of-wooing-muslim-votes-in-indian-politics&catid=78:sujit&Itemid=58

"This time in the year 2000 the community was still debating the Islamic permissibility of participation in the American political system. While Muslim political activists were expounding the virtues of voting – particularly block voting – the intellectuals were busy establishing the compatibility of Islam and democracy"

"the negative aspects of block voting are less studied and comprehended."

http://www.ijtihad.org/American-Muslim-Votes.htm

presence

lib3rtarian
01-17-2012, 09:06 PM
Unfortunately, the so called "social conservatives" would find this very disturbing and turn them away from Paul.

KCIndy
01-17-2012, 09:17 PM
I remember back in the '07-'08 cycle, we had a pretty good outreach effort toward some Muslim communities being pushed by some Muslim RPF members. Sad that it doesn't seem to have happened this time around, unless I've just missed it.

Dsylexic
01-18-2012, 02:44 AM
25% of american blacks are muslims.thats a good target for TMOT and other videos.and nation of islam is anti fed and pro gold too.

Xenophage
01-18-2012, 04:03 AM
"“These laws are obviously directed at policing Muslims,” Siddiqui said. “Ron Paul knows how to differentiate between Muslims and terrorists, and he would never sacrifice any citizen’s liberties over security.”"

By Omar Sacirbey| Religion News Service, Updated: Tuesday, January 17, 4:40 PM

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-faith/muslims-say-ron-paul-is-their-kind-of-republican/2012/01/17/gIQA9oqH6P_story.html?tid=pm_national_pop

"After abandoning the GOP in droves during the George W. Bush presidency, some Muslims say Paul is the kind of Republican who could draw them back and seriously challenge their loyalty to President Obama."

--------------------

From what I understand of Muslim politics... THEY WANT TO BLOC VOTE. Especially in this election. Sure they are a small % of the electorate... but their leadership strongly wishes to vote by block.... and time and again they're leaning Paul.

The Art of Wooing Muslims:

"They vote in larger proportions and participate more in politics, much more than the rest of the electorate. They vote ‘en bloc’ for one candidate or party. Muslim voters are more ‘strategic’ in their voting and tend to hold back their decisions until the last moment.
They are more dependent on others in their decision making and more likely to be influenced by clerics or community leaders and guided more by narrow community issues rather than by broader collective or national interests. In many Muslim-dominated areas, they do not have individual opinion and cast their votes as per the fatwa of their religious leaders. "
[]

"The above characteristics make Muslims an extraordinary political community easy to maneuver in elections."

http://islam-watch.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=742:the-art-of-wooing-muslim-votes-in-indian-politics&catid=78:sujit&Itemid=58

"This time in the year 2000 the community was still debating the Islamic permissibility of participation in the American political system. While Muslim political activists were expounding the virtues of voting – particularly block voting – the intellectuals were busy establishing the compatibility of Islam and democracy"

"the negative aspects of block voting are less studied and comprehended."

http://www.ijtihad.org/American-Muslim-Votes.htm

presence

Why are you dissing on muslims so hard? If I were a muslim I'd find the entire above post extremely offensive. You're basically saying that muslims are all sheep, easily manipulated, with no independent thought or action. Well, most *people* are, but how are muslims any more so? Is that a core pillar of Islam?

I don't trust the sources, and if what you say is true then muslims would be less likely to give Paul a good look, not more.

Nastynate
01-18-2012, 06:05 AM
Why are you dissing on muslims so hard? If I were a muslim I'd find the entire above post extremely offensive. You're basically saying that muslims are all sheep, easily manipulated, with no independent thought or action. Well, most *people* are, but how are muslims any more so? Is that a core pillar of Islam?

I don't trust the sources, and if what you say is true then muslims would be less likely to give Paul a good look, not more.

I don't see the offense. The OP was just posting stuff about how Muslims (from my guess) want to be a political force in the US. Where politicians have to cater to them somewhat so their voice could be heard. I don't see what is wrong with trying to get your voice heard by tell your community and people of the like mind to rally in support for your mutual interest. Its not as if they're all sheep either, and that isn't what i gathered from the post anyway. Because in the end it is up to the individual to cast the vote not the group.

RM918
01-18-2012, 06:09 AM
Psh, an endorsement from someone with a Middle Eastern name is about the same to neocons as being endorsed by Beelzebub.

Kingfisher
01-18-2012, 06:22 AM
Psh, an endorsement from someone with a Middle Eastern name is about the same to neocons as being endorsed by Beelzebub.

True

marc1888
01-18-2012, 11:55 AM
muslims are very happy to be treated as individual human beings and not a homogenous group as many on the left and right love to do. Ron Paul has been very well liked for quite a while. I know in NC the muslim community endorsed BJ Lawson in 2008 and virtually no other republican.

Spikender
01-18-2012, 11:59 AM
muslims are very happy to be treated as individual human beings and not a homogenous group as many on the left and right love to do. Ron Paul has been very well liked for quite a while. I know in NC the muslim community endorsed BJ Lawson in 2008 and virtually no other republican.

That's my main problem with the left and the right; they group people together and don't treat them as individuals, instead bashing everyone collectively. It happens with every group, such as Christians and Atheists, but Muslims are the main group being targeted, especially by neocons, who are pretty much saying that all Muslims are evil and that they want to take over the world.

fisharmor
01-18-2012, 12:03 PM
Unfortunately, the so called "social conservatives" would find this very disturbing and turn them away from Paul.

The most amusing thing about this is the fact that "social conservatives" have much more in common with Muslims than they would care to admit.

jkr
01-18-2012, 12:07 PM
, especially by neocons, who are pretty much saying that all Muslims are evil and that they want to take over the world. ...when they have already done it.

alucard13mmfmj
01-18-2012, 03:29 PM
wait.. i dont think this works in our advantage. media would spin it as "Ron Paul is terrorist's choice for republican". this will turn some GOP voters away, especially in south carolina. it works for us in the general elections, but itll hurt us in GOP nomination. they should reserve their support of Ron Paul until after Ron wins the nomination >.<

presence
01-21-2012, 04:41 PM
Muslims are the main group being targeted, especially by neocons, who are pretty much saying that all Muslims are evil and that they want to take over the world.

Exactly... which is why I believe their leadership is looking to bloc against that establishment perspective.

presence

heavenlyboy34
01-21-2012, 04:44 PM
Psh, an endorsement from someone with a Middle Eastern name is about the same to neocons as being endorsed by Beelzebub.Unless it's a Mid-easterner who's also a US puppet. ;)

acptulsa
01-21-2012, 04:48 PM
I remember back in the '07-'08 cycle, we had a pretty good outreach effort toward some Muslim communities being pushed by some Muslim RPF members. Sad that it doesn't seem to have happened this time around, unless I've just missed it.

And you probably have. And there's a good reason for it. Many of them want to be effective, and all of them are painfully aware that many would read their endorsement as amounting to, 'Boogeymen for Paul'. Can't blame them for wanting to avoid that and having sense enough to avoid it.


The most amusing thing about this is the fact that "social conservatives" have much more in common with Muslims than they would care to admit.

Hmmm... Don't know about all that. Fundamentalists have more in common with other fundamentalists of other sects than with non-fundamentalists of their own sect. But not all of any sect are fundamentalist--unless you're talking about some little Moonie cult. Which Islam clearly is not.