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View Full Version : Atlas Shrugged - The movie; Viable campaign material?




JuicyG
12-25-2011, 01:05 PM
I`ve just seen the movie few days ago and was wondering if this could make a good campaign material as it could provide a powerful tool in bringing people closer to libertarianism and Ron Paul.
The trailer, if you haven`t seen movie already:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6W07bFa4TzM
Just 1st part was released so far and two more parts are coming. Second part should come in 2012. Guy who financed the movie with money out of his own pocket(around 10 to 20mil $) hopes it could make a splash by the time of the 2012 elections. http://www.unitedliberty.org/articles/9048-atlas-shrugged-part-2-set-for-release-just-before-2012-election

Movie explained by the producer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sw0yS_JhUpE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SG_q98Pjcys
Should also attract all GOP conservatives, especially as message resonates very well with them and idea of limited government which became obvious to some that only Ron Paul can provide.

Here`s Hannity talking positively about the movie and how few liberals in Hollywood didn`t want to see this movie come to life. However if people watch en-mass the movie, it will most likely have a blowback effect and give Ron Paul more votes. Ayn Rand was a libertarian and that message resonates very well throughout the movie. The only alternatives to Ron Paul(that have a shot) are at the moment two crony government intervensionists: Romney and Newt


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pgh96DhU7Yc&feature=related

craezie
12-25-2011, 02:42 PM
While there are aspects of the film (and book) that I like, I hardly think that it is good advertisement for libertarian philosophy. As my husband (who is already a Ron Paul supporter) said after watching a couple of weeks ago, that film is one of the most depressing he has ever seen. Rand's values actually seem incredibly destructive to society and family, and I think that most people will immediately find something "off". I guess I prefer to think of myself as a compassionate libertarian, I actually think that the most helpless and vulnerable in society should be protected and supported. Maybe its because I am a Christian--while I believe that all people are created free and no one's conscience can be compelled, I also believe that you should use your freedom for the good of others--not only yourself.

JuicyG
12-25-2011, 03:16 PM
While there are aspects of the film (and book) that I like, I hardly think that it is good advertisement for libertarian philosophy. As my husband (who is already a Ron Paul supporter) said after watching a couple of weeks ago, that film is one of the most depressing he has ever seen. Rand's values actually seem incredibly destructive to society and family, and I think that most people will immediately find something "off". I guess I prefer to think of myself as a compassionate libertarian, I actually think that the most helpless and vulnerable in society should be protected and supported. Maybe its because I am a Christian--while I believe that all people are created free and no one's conscience can be compelled, I also believe that you should use your freedom for the good of others--not only yourself.

Hmm, you may have a point there in a way. However when watching the movie, most of the things that got through to me was how toxic crony capitalism and government intervention could be.
Regarding the social/charity issue; many of those who are helped enter the mindset of being helped and expect therefore to be helped, creating a vicious circle of feeling entitled to other person`s wealth. Movie highlighted this very well in a scene when the Rearden Metal CEO gifts his wife a bracelet made of his new metal alloy and she along with relatives despises it and complains about the low value of the gift. They all felt entitled to his wealth and made him feel guilty about it.
I think that many people who some might consider helpless are thrown into that mindset and subsequently stop trying to earn for themselves. It`s something dangerous to make people rely on aid instead of trying to provide for themselves. Like that Lao Tzu saying “Give a man a fish; feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish; feed him for a lifetime"

Everyone has something unique to offer to the world, even people with disabilities. Very often these apparent disabilities come with certain new ways of looking at things and approach to life "When God closes a door he opens a window". Many people with so called disabilities ended up achieving great things and have ironically argued that their "disability" played great role in that process. People are victims only if they choose to be.
Also remember that Ayn Rand provided for her husband at a time when he wasn`t making much money. She argued that it was in her own self interest to do so as he was providing much comfort to her and support. The same way, most people will help their fellow men out of self interest as they are part of their own lives and make their lives complete or add something valuable to it. I wouldn`t let my loved ones die because something in me will most likely die with them. You can call that christian compassion or rational self interest. End result is the same.

LibertyEagle
12-25-2011, 03:32 PM
Personally, I thought the movie was a horrible adaptation of a fabulous book.

JuicyG
12-25-2011, 03:36 PM
Personally, I thought the movie was a horrible adaptation of a fabulous book.

First part was just the intro so to speak. The next parts, 2nd(set for 2012) and 3d will have bigger budgets.

jsingh1022
12-25-2011, 07:46 PM
I just finished watching it and I was very impressed. :cool:

You will always have the people who prefer the book over the movie. However, the majority of Americans are more interested in watching a 90 minute movie versus reading a 1,000 page book.

To answer your question I say yes it could be used to convert people to libertarianism. The movie brilliantly exploits the problems with the crony capitalism phenomenon.

heavenlyboy34
12-25-2011, 08:12 PM
At first I was leaning towards no...but having thought about it, it could definitely be an educational tool. I haven't seen the movie, but I'm several chapters into the book. From the trailers, it seems that the film will be appreciated much more by average audiences than the book. (I suspect the book would be tedious reading to the average person, but I rather like it)