PDA

View Full Version : How Rand Might Appeal To Democrats In Congress




anaconda
11-04-2010, 04:37 PM
I was thinking that, rather than being a wildly divisive force in Congress, Rand may be in a strangely uncommon place to unify diverse segments. Since Rand is viewed as significantly OUTSIDE the mainstream GOP, it may be politically acceptable for various Democrats to align themselves with his legislation (with cosponsorships and votes) as well as many Republicans. Many Democrats may welcome the opportunity to distance themselves from Obama while still being able to claim that, through Rand, they are also rebuking the GOP as a whole. After all, Rand's poositions are pretty palatable things that Dems may want to also go on the record with (balanced budgets, read the bills, term limits, constitutional authority for legislation, etc.).

Similarly, Republicans that want to distance themselves from Bush style Republicans may be equally enthusiastic.

Rand may be the alternative to a "centrist" and become a "centrist" leader sort of by default. I do get the sense that he wants to lead and make things actually happen.

Thoughts?

sailingaway
11-04-2010, 04:38 PM
He's trying to get Dems who want reform into the tea party caucus.

And look at this: http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=267249

I think centrist is the wrong word, though. It sounds like Lindsay and McCain. Non-partisan, maybe.

anaconda
11-04-2010, 04:49 PM
He's trying to get Dems who want reform into the tea party caucus.

And look at this: http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=267249

I think centrist is the wrong word, though. It sounds like Lindsay and McCain. Non-partisan, maybe.

By "centrist" in this context I mean that members of Congress from both the left and the right can seek a peculiar "safe cover" from voter blowback by actually aligning themselves with Rand on quite a number of issues. They will look like they are pushing back against the status quo on behalf of the people. They may have to kiss off their respective elite party support as a trade off.

sailingaway
11-04-2010, 04:51 PM
By "centrist" in this context I mean that members of Congress from both the left and the right can seek a peculiar "safe cover" from voter blowback by actually aligning themselves with Rand on quite a number of issues. They will look like they are pushing back against the status quo on behalf of the people. They may have to kiss off their respective elite party support as a trade off.

Yeah, that is how Ron did audit the fed, even in the partisan congress. Dems said 'well, his libertarian-type government reform ideas are different'.

anaconda
11-04-2010, 04:55 PM
He's trying to get Dems who want reform into the tea party caucus.

And look at this: http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=267249

I think centrist is the wrong word, though. It sounds like Lindsay and McCain. Non-partisan, maybe.

I like the last part of the article! Can you link me to something about Rand "trying to get Dems who want reform into the Tea Party caucus?" I'd love to have a look at that.

BuddyRey
11-04-2010, 05:16 PM
I think centrist is the wrong word, though. It sounds like Lindsay and McCain. Non-partisan, maybe.

Ditto. The way the media uses the word "Centrist", it almost always refers to somebody who combines the penchant for big spending and central planning of the left with the jingoist foreign policy and moral absolutism of the right (Lieberman, Graham, and McCain being the best examples). Centrist never means "live-and-let-live" or "the best balance between two extremes", because if it did, pundits would use the term to describe Ron Paul and Gary Johnson. Instead, these men get called "extremists" when they are anything but, and the real extremists get lauded and heralded as "brave mavericks who bridge both sides of the aisle."

/rant

sailingaway
11-04-2010, 05:19 PM
I like the last part of the article! Can you link me to something about Rand "trying to get Dems who want reform into the Tea Party caucus?" I'd love to have a look at that.

It was just a line in an interview about the tea party caucus he said he wanted both House and senate members, of either party, so they could work on reforms. He was asked if McConnell could join and he said "Absolutely!" but smiled.

BuddyRey
11-04-2010, 11:07 PM
I do like the OP's idea though. I think we should explore the best ways to build common ground with honest people on the left. Whether one chooses to do this by crafting utilitarian arguments that would appeal to liberals, or by appealing to their sense of morality and aversion to violence, it can definitely be done with certain liberals.

itshappening
11-05-2010, 12:57 AM
Portman, Blunt, Coats, Graham. McCain, McConnell, Murkowski (?) the GOP caucus is still dominated heavily by big spending special interest senators