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powerofreason
10-02-2010, 02:26 AM
Which drug, in your opinion, has more medical applications: methamphetamine or marijuana? The FDA has approved methamphetamine for the treatment of ADHD in children as young as SIX (a long time ago).


Indications and Usage
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: As an integral part of a total treatment program for a stabilizing effect in children over 6 years of age with behaviors characterized as moderate to severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity, emotional lability, and impulsivity. Diagnosis should not be made with finality when these symptoms are of comparatively recent origin. Nonlocalizing (soft) neurological signs, learning disability, and abnormal EEG may or may not be present, and a diagnosis of central nervous system dysfunction may or may not be warranted.

Uhh, isn't regular amphetamine (adderall, vyvanse) already overkill for a kid with a developing brain???

How Meth Damages the Brain: Meth does 2 main things. It reverses the direction of SERT, DAT, and NET, and directly increases the secretion of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. Dopamine levels can rise to 1200% of normal. When that dopamine eventually breaks down, toxic byproducts are created, like hydrogen peroxide. This causes oxidative damage (irreplaceable nerve cells die).

http://www.lundbeckinc.com/USA/products/CNS/desoxyn/default.asp

Furthermore, by directly overloading the brain's reward center, addiction is nearly impossible to avoid, for most people. I happen to know a drug abuse counselor. He described quitting meth as like ripping your soul out of your body. Its that psychologically traumatizing.

Bottom line: The FDA considers meth, a highly neurotoxic, extremely addictive drug, as safe for children over the age of 6. Yet will not consider the scientifically proven benefits of medical marijuana. A drug far more benign than nicotine or alcohol, the two "okay" recreational drugs in our society.

Comments?

Working Poor
10-02-2010, 02:39 AM
Bottom line: The FDA considers meth, a highly neurotoxic, extremely addictive drug, as safe for children over the age of 6. Yet will not consider the scientifically proven benefits of medical marijuana. A drug far more benign than nicotine or alcohol, the two "okay" recreational drugs in our society.

Ain't science in conjunction with the FDA just a blast? Eat your GMO corn flakes and go back to bed dear.

squarepusher
10-02-2010, 02:43 AM
boom
http://www.phoenixtears.ca/article/resources/links/granny-s-list/grannys-list.html

WaterWine41
10-02-2010, 02:46 AM
Wait a second buddy... there's a difference between adderall (amphetamine) and methamphetamine. Just because dextroamphetamine shares 11 letters in order with methamphetamine, does not the same substance make.

That being said, children shouldn't be taking any of this stuff.

powerofreason
10-02-2010, 03:01 AM
boom
http://www.phoenixtears.ca/article/resources/links/granny-s-list/grannys-list.html

You wanna hear somethin funny? Instead of using mj to detox from cocaine the current medically accepted treatment is Abilify, an antipsychotic with potentially hellish side effects. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aripiprazole


5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
5.1 Use in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis
Increased Mortality
Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at
an increased risk of death. ABILIFY (aripiprazole) is not approved for the treatment of
patients with dementia-related psychosis [see BOXED WARNING].
Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, Including Stroke
In placebo-controlled clinical studies (two flexible dose and one fixed dose study) of
dementia-related psychosis, there was an increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse
events (eg, stroke, transient ischemic attack), including fatalities, in aripiprazole-treated
patients (mean age: 84 years; range: 78-88 years). In the fixed-dose study, there was a
statistically significant dose response relationship for cerebrovascular adverse events in
patients treated with aripiprazole. Aripiprazole is not approved for the treatment of patients with
dementia-related psychosis [see also BOXED WARNING].
Safety Experience in Elderly Patients with Psychosis Associated with Alzheimer’s
Disease
In three, 10-week, placebo-controlled studies of aripiprazole in elderly patients with psychosis
associated with Alzheimer’s disease (n=938; mean age: 82.4 years; range: 56-99 years), the
treatment-emergent adverse events that were reported at an incidence of ≥3% and aripiprazole
incidence at least twice that for placebo were lethargy [placebo 2%, aripiprazole 5%],
somnolence (including sedation) [placebo 3%, aripiprazole 8%], and incontinence (primarily,
urinary incontinence) [placebo 1%, aripiprazole 5%], excessive salivation [placebo 0%,
aripiprazole 4%], and lightheadedness [placebo 1%, aripiprazole 4%].
The safety and efficacy of ABILIFY in the treatment of patients with psychosis associated with
dementia have not been established. If the prescriber elects to treat such patients with ABILIFY,
vigilance should be exercised, particularly for the emergence of difficulty swallowing or
excessive somnolence, which could predispose to accidental injury or aspiration [see also
BOXED WARNING].
ABILIFY® (aripiprazole) ABILIFY® (aripiprazole)
5.2 5.3
Clinical Worsening of Depression and Suicide Risk
Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), both adult and pediatric, may experience
worsening of their depression and/or the emergence of suicidal ideation and behavior
(suicidality) or unusual changes in behavior, whether or not they are taking antidepressant
medications, and this risk may persist until significant remission occurs. Suicide is a known
risk of depression and certain other psychiatric disorders, and these disorders themselves are
the strongest predictors of suicide. There has been a long-standing concern, however, that
antidepressants may have a role in inducing worsening of depression and the emergence of
suicidality in certain patients during the early phases of treatment. Pooled analyses of
short-term placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) showed that
these drugs increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children,
adolescents, and young adults (ages 18-24) with MDD and other psychiatric disorders. Short-term
studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared to
placebo in adults beyond age 24; there was a reduction with antidepressants compared to placebo
in adults aged 65 and older.
The pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials in children and adolescents with MDD,
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders included a total of
24 short-term trials of 9 antidepressant drugs in over 4400 patients. The pooled analyses of
placebo-controlled trials in adults with MDD or other psychiatric disorders included a total of
295 short-term trials (median duration of 2 months) of 11 antidepressant drugs in over 77,000
patients. There was considerable variation in risk of suicidality among drugs, but a tendency
toward an increase in the younger patients for almost all drugs studied. There were differences
in absolute risk of suicidality across the different indications, with the highest incidence in MDD.
The risk differences (drug vs. placebo), however, were relatively stable within age strata and
across indications. These risk differences (drug-placebo difference in the number of cases of
suicidality per 1000 patients treated) are provided in Table 4.
Table 4:
Age Range
Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Cases
of Suicidality per 1000 Patients Treated
Increases Compared to Placebo
<18
14 additional cases
18-24
5 additional cases
Decreases Compared to Placebo
25-64
1 fewer case
≥65
6 fewer cases
No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric trials. There were suicides in the adult trials, but
the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about drug effect on suicide.
It is unknown whether the suicidality risk extends to longer-term use, ie, beyond several
months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in
adults with depression that the use of antidepressants can delay the recurrence of depression.
All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored
appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, and unusual
changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy,
or at times of dose changes, either increases or decreases.
The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility,
aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have
been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for MDD as
well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric. Although a causal link
between the emergence of such symptoms and either the worsening of depression and/or the
emergence of suicidal impulses has not been established, there is concern that such symptoms
may represent precursors to emerging suicidality.
Consideration should be given to changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly
discontinuing the medication, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are
experiencing emergent suicidality or symptoms that might be precursors to worsening
depression or suicidality, especially if these symptoms are severe, abrupt in onset, or were not
part of the patient’s presenting symptoms.
Families and caregivers of patients being treated with antidepressants for major
depressive disorder or other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric, should be
alerted about the need to monitor patients for the emergence of agitation, irritability,
unusual changes in behavior, and the other symptoms described above, as well as the
emergence of suicidality, and to report such symptoms immediately to healthcare
providers. Such monitoring should include daily observation by families and caregivers.
Prescriptions for ABILIFY should be written for the smallest quantity of tablets consistent with
good patient management, in order to reduce the risk of overdose.
Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder: A major depressive episode may be the initial
presentation of bipolar disorder. It is generally believed (though not established in controlled
trials) that treating such an episode with an antidepressant alone may increase the likelihood
of precipitation of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of
the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to
initiating treatment with an antidepressant, patients with depressive symptoms should be
adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should
include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and
depression.
It should be noted that ABILIFY is not approved for use in treating depression in the pediatric
population.
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)
A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome
(NMS) may occur with administration of antipsychotic drugs, including aripiprazole. Rare cases
of NMS occurred during aripiprazole treatment in the worldwide clinical database. Clinical
manifestations of NMS are hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, altered mental status, and evidence of
autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and cardiac
dysrhythmia). Additional signs may include elevated creatine phosphokinase, myoglobinuria
(rhabdomyolysis), and acute renal failure.
The diagnostic evaluation of patients with this syndrome is complicated. In arriving at a
diagnosis, it is important to exclude cases where the clinical presentation includes both serious
medical illness (eg, pneumonia, systemic infection) and untreated or inadequately treated
extrapyramidal signs and symptoms (EPS). Other important considerations in the differential
diagnosis include central anticholinergic toxicity, heat stroke, drug fever, and primary central
nervous system pathology.
The management of NMS should include: 1) immediate discontinuation of antipsychotic drugs
and other drugs not essential to concurrent therapy; 2) intensive symptomatic treatment and
medical monitoring; and 3) treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems for which
specific treatments are available. There is no general agreement about specific
pharmacological treatment regimens for uncomplicated NMS.
If a patient requires antipsychotic drug treatment after recovery from NMS, the potential
reintroduction of drug therapy should be carefully considered. The patient should be carefully
monitored, since recurrences of NMS have been reported.
5.4
Tardive Dyskinesia
A syndrome of potentially irreversible, involuntary, dyskinetic movements may develop in
patients treated with antipsychotic drugs. Although the prevalence of the syndrome appears to
be highest among the elderly, especially elderly women, it is impossible to rely upon prevalence
estimates to predict, at the inception of antipsychotic treatment, which patients are likely to
develop the syndrome. Whether antipsychotic drug products differ in their potential to cause
tardive dyskinesia is unknown.
The risk of developing tardive dyskinesia and the likelihood that it will become irreversible are
believed to increase as the duration of treatment and the total cumulative dose of antipsychotic
drugs administered to the patient increase. However, the syndrome can develop, although much
less commonly, after relatively brief treatment periods at low doses.
There is no known treatment for established cases of tardive dyskinesia, although the
syndrome may remit, partially or completely, if antipsychotic treatment is withdrawn.
Antipsychotic treatment, itself, however, may suppress (or partially suppress) the signs and
symptoms of the syndrome and, thereby, may possibly mask the underlying process. The effect
that symptomatic suppression has upon the long-term course of the syndrome is unknown.
Given these considerations, ABILIFY should be prescribed in a manner that is most likely to
minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia. Chronic antipsychotic treatment should generally
be reserved for patients who suffer from a chronic illness that (1) is known to respond to
antipsychotic drugs and (2) for whom alternative, equally effective, but potentially less harmful
treatments are not available or appropriate. In patients who do require chronic treatment, the
smallest dose and the shortest duration of treatment producing a satisfactory clinical response
should be sought. The need for continued treatment should be reassessed periodically.
If signs and symptoms of tardive dyskinesia appear in a patient on ABILIFY, drug discontinuation
should be considered. However, some patients may require treatment with ABILIFY despite the
presence of the syndrome.
5.5
Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus
Hyperglycemia, in some cases extreme and associated with ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar
coma or death, has been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics. There have
been few reports of hyperglycemia in patients treated with ABILIFY [see ADVERSE REACTIONS
(6.2, 6.3)]. Although fewer patients have been treated with ABILIFY, it is not known if this more
limited experience is the sole reason for the paucity of such reports. Assessment of the
relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and glucose abnormalities is complicated by
the possibility of an increased background risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with
schizophrenia and the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the general population.
Given these confounders, the relationship between atypical antipsychotic use and
hyperglycemia-related adverse events is not completely understood. However, epidemiological
studies which did not include ABILIFY suggest an increased risk of treatment-emergent
hyperglycemia-related adverse events in patients treated with the atypical antipsychotics
included in these studies. Because ABILIFY was not marketed at the time these studies were
performed, it is not known if ABILIFY is associated with this increased risk. Precise risk
estimates for hyperglycemia-related adverse events in patients treated with atypical
antipsychotics are not available.
Patients with an established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who are started on atypical
antipsychotics should be monitored regularly for worsening of glucose control. Patients with
risk factors for diabetes mellitus (eg, obesity, family history of diabetes) who are starting
treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing at the
beginning of treatment and periodically during treatment. Any patient treated with atypical
antipsychotics should be monitored for symptoms of hyperglycemia including polydipsia,
polyuria, polyphagia, and weakness. Patients who develop symptoms of hyperglycemia during
treatment with atypical antipsychotics should undergo fasting blood glucose testing. In some
cases, hyperglycemia has resolved when the atypical antipsychotic was discontinued; however,
some patients required continuation of anti-diabetic treatment despite discontinuation of the
suspect drug.
ABILIFY® (aripiprazole) ABILIFY® (aripiprazole)
5.6 5.13 Use in Patients with Concomitant Illness
Clinical experience with ABILIFY in patients with certain concomitant systemic illnesses is limited
[see USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS (8.6, 8.7)].
ABILIFY has not been evaluated or used to any appreciable extent in patients with a recent history
of myocardial infarction or unstable heart disease. Patients with these diagnoses were excluded
from premarketing clinical studies [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1, 5.6)].
6
ADVERSE REACTIONS
6.1
Overall Adverse Reactions Profile
The following are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling:
Orthostatic Hypotension
Aripiprazole may cause orthostatic hypotension, perhaps due to its α1-adrenergic receptor
antagonism. The incidence of orthostatic hypotension-associated events from short-term,
placebo-controlled trials of adult patients on oral ABILIFY (n=2467) included (aripiprazole
incidence, placebo incidence) orthostatic hypotension (1%, 0.3%), postural dizziness (0.5%,
0.3%), and syncope (0.5%, 0.4%); of pediatric patients 6 to 17 years of age (n=611) on oral
ABILIFY included orthostatic hypotension (0.5%, 0%), postural dizziness (0.3%, 0%), and
syncope (0.2%, 0%); and of patients on ABILIFY Injection (n=501) included orthostatic hypotension
(0.6%, 0%), postural dizziness (0.2%, 0.5%), and syncope (0.4%, 0%).
The incidence of a significant orthostatic change in blood pressure (defined as a decrease in
systolic blood pressure ≥20 mmHg accompanied by an increase in heart rate ≥25 when
comparing standing to supine values) for aripiprazole was not meaningfully different from placebo
(aripiprazole incidence, placebo incidence): in adult oral aripiprazole-treated patients (4%, 2%), in
pediatric oral aripiprazole-treated patients aged 6 to 17 years (0.2%, 1%), or in aripiprazole
injection-treated patients (3%, 2%).
Aripiprazole should be used with caution in patients with known cardiovascular disease (history
of myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease, heart failure or conduction abnormalities),
cerebrovascular disease, or conditions which would predispose patients to hypotension
(dehydration, hypovolemia, and treatment with antihypertensive medications).
If parenteral benzodiazepine therapy is deemed necessary in addition to aripiprazole injection
treatment, patients should be monitored for excessive sedation and for orthostatic hypotension
[see DRUG INTERACTIONS (7.3)].
5.7
Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis
Class Effect: In clinical trial and/or postmarketing experience, events of leukopenia/neutropenia
have been reported temporally related to antipsychotic agents, including ABILIFY. Agranulocytosis
has also been reported.
Possible risk factors for leukopenia/neutropenia include pre-existing low white blood cell count
(WBC) and history of drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia. Patients with a history of a clinically
significant low WBC or drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia should have their complete blood
count (CBC) monitored frequently during the first few months of therapy and discontinuation of
ABILIFY should be considered at the first sign of a clinically significant decline in WBC in the
absence of other causative factors.
Patients with clinically significant neutropenia should be carefully monitored for fever or other
symptoms or signs of infection and treated promptly if such symptoms or signs occur. Patients
with severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3) should discontinue ABILIFY and
have their WBC followed until recovery.
5.8
Seizures/Convulsions
In short-term, placebo-controlled trials, seizures/convulsions occurred in 0.1% (3/2467) of adult
patients treated with oral aripiprazole, in 0.2% (1/611) of pediatric patients (6 to 17 years), and in
0.2% (1/501) of adult aripiprazole injection-treated patients.
As with other antipsychotic drugs, aripiprazole should be used cautiously in patients with a history
of seizures or with conditions that lower the seizure threshold, eg, Alzheimer’s dementia.
Conditions that lower the seizure threshold may be more prevalent in a population of 65 years or
older.
5.9
Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment
ABILIFY, like other antipsychotics, may have the potential to impair judgment, thinking, or motor
skills. For example, in short-term, placebo-controlled trials, somnolence (including sedation) was
reported as follows (aripiprazole incidence, placebo incidence): in adult patients (n=2467) treated
with oral ABILIFY (11%, 6%), in pediatric patients ages 6 to 17 (n=611) (24%, 6%), and in adult
patients (n=501) on ABILIFY Injection (9%, 6%). Somnolence (including sedation) led to
discontinuation in 0.3% (8/2467) of adult patients and 3% (15/611) of pediatric patients (6 to 17
years) on oral ABILIFY in short-term, placebo-controlled trials, but did not lead to discontinuation
of any adult patients on ABILIFY Injection.
Despite the relatively modest increased incidence of these events compared to placebo, patients
should be cautioned about operating hazardous machinery, including automobiles, until they are
reasonably certain that therapy with ABILIFY does not affect them adversely.
5.10 Body Temperature Regulation
Disruption of the body’s ability to reduce core body temperature has been attributed to
antipsychotic agents. Appropriate care is advised when prescribing aripiprazole for patients who
will be experiencing conditions which may contribute to an elevation in core body temperature,
(eg, exercising strenuously, exposure to extreme heat, receiving concomitant medication with
anticholinergic activity, or being subject to dehydration) [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.3)].
5.11 Suicide
The possibility of a suicide attempt is inherent in psychotic illnesses, bipolar disorder, and major
depressive disorder, and close supervision of high-risk patients should accompany drug therapy.
Prescriptions for ABILIFY should be written for the smallest quantity consistent with good patient
management in order to reduce the risk of overdose [see ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.2, 6.3)].
In two 6-week placebo-controlled studies of aripiprazole as adjunctive treatment of major
depressive disorder, the incidences of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts were 0% (0/371) for
aripiprazole and 0.5% (2/366) for placebo.
5.12 Dysphagia
Esophageal dysmotility and aspiration have been associated with antipsychotic drug use,
including ABILIFY. Aspiration pneumonia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly
patients, in particular those with advanced Alzheimer’s dementia. Aripiprazole and other
antipsychotic drugs should be used cautiously in patients at risk for aspiration pneumonia
[see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1) and ADVERSE REACTIONS (6.3)].













Use in Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Psychosis [see BOXED WARNING and
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.1)]
Clinical Worsening of Depression and Suicide Risk [see BOXED WARNING and WARNINGS
AND PRECAUTIONS (5.2)]
Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.3)]
Tardive Dyskinesia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.4)]
Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.5)]
Orthostatic Hypotension [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.6)]
Leukopenia, Neutropenia, and Agranulocytosis [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.7)]
Seizures/Convulsions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.8)]
Potential for Cognitive and Motor Impairment [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.9)]
Body Temperature Regulation [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.10)]
Suicide [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.11)]
Dysphagia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.12)]
Use in Patients with Concomitant Illness [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5.13)]
The most common adverse reactions in adult patients in clinical trials (≥10%) were nausea,
vomiting, constipation, headache, dizziness, akathisia, anxiety, insomnia, and restlessness.
The most common adverse reactions in the pediatric clinical trials (≥10%) were somnolence,
headache, vomiting, extrapyramidal disorder, fatigue, increased appetite, insomnia, nausea,
nasopharyngitis, and weight increased.
Aripiprazole has been evaluated for safety in 13,543 adult patients who participated in
multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder,
Dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, Parkinson’s disease, and alcoholism, and who had
approximately 7619 patient-years of exposure to oral aripiprazole and 749 patients with exposure
to aripiprazole injection. A total of 3390 patients were treated with oral aripiprazole for at least 180
days and 1933 patients treated with oral aripiprazole had at least 1 year of exposure.
Aripiprazole has been evaluated for safety in 920 patients (6 to 17 years) who participated in
multiple-dose, clinical trials in schizophrenia, bipolar mania, or autistic disorder and who had
approximately 517 patient-years of exposure to oral aripiprazole. A total of 465 pediatric patients
were treated with oral aripiprazole for at least 180 days and 117 pediatric patients treated with
oral aripiprazole had at least 1 year of exposure.
The conditions and duration of treatment with aripiprazole (monotherapy and adjunctive therapy
with antidepressants or mood stabilizers) included (in overlapping categories) double-blind,
comparative and noncomparative open-label studies, inpatient and outpatient studies, fixed- and
flexible-dose studies, and short- and longer-term exposure.
Adverse events during exposure were obtained by collecting volunteered adverse events, as well
as results of physical examinations, vital signs, weights, laboratory analyses, and ECG. Adverse
experiences were recorded by clinical investigators using terminology of their own choosing. In
the tables and tabulations that follow, MedDRA dictionary terminology has been used to classify
reported adverse events into a smaller number of standardized event categories, in order to
provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse events.
The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who
experienced at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse event of the type listed. An event was
considered treatment emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy
following baseline evaluation. There was no attempt to use investigator causality assessments;
ie, all events meeting the defined criteria, regardless of investigator causality are included.
Throughout this section, adverse reactions are reported. These are adverse events that were
considered to be reasonably associated with the use of ABILIFY (adverse drug reactions) based on
the comprehensive assessment of the available adverse event information. A causal association
for ABILIFY often cannot be reliably established in individual cases.
The figures in the tables and tabulations cannot be used to predict the incidence of side effects in
the course of usual medical practice where patient characteristics and other factors differ from
those that prevailed in the clinical trials. Similarly, the cited frequencies cannot be compared with
figures obtained from other clinical investigations involving different treatment, uses, and
investigators. The cited figures, however, do provide the prescriber with some basis for estimating
the relative contribution of drug and nondrug factors to the adverse reaction incidence in the
population studied.

powerofreason
10-02-2010, 03:07 AM
Wait a second buddy... there's a difference between adderall (amphetamine) and methamphetamine. Just because dextroamphetamine shares 11 letters in order with methamphetamine, does not the same substance make.

That being said, children shouldn't be taking any of this stuff.

Did you know another name for methamphetamine is dextromethamphetamine? The only difference is the addition of a methyl group which allows the drug to more easily pass the brain-blood-barrier, among a few other things.

Dextroamphetamine:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/Dextroamphetamine-2D-skeletal.png/167px-Dextroamphetamine-2D-skeletal.png

Meth:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Methamphetamine.svg/200px-Methamphetamine.svg.png