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jj111
10-13-2007, 09:25 AM
Has headquarters pushed the idea of door-to-door canvassing?

Someone in my group mentioned that headquarters allegedly put out notice that they want the meetup groups to focus on door-to-door canvassing of homes.

I personally have never seen any such notice or directive from anyone in the national campaign leadership.

I am not too thrilled with the concept of door-to-door canvassing of homes because I don't think it is anywhere near as efficient as other methods.

Door to door canvassing requires walking time between homes, in San Francisco it often means walking up a flight of stairs in order to get to the doorbell, it often means waiting a minute or two to see if anybody answers the door, and during most of the day it means finding that there is nobody home and nobody there answering the door. Even if somebody answers, they may refuse to engage in any substantial discussion with you or take any literature from you.

Using voter registration lists adds another layer of inefficiency in terms of time, because you have to refer to the list before you go to your next house, and sometimes you skip a house on your list, and have to go back, and or have to cross the street each time because the lists are not in the order of a map.

To me it is a very inefficient way of meeting potential voters.

I find "canvassing" in crowds, such as fairs, concerts, conventions, parks, farmers' markets, and busy city areas where there are large crowds of people much more efficient than targetted door-to-door canvassing.

The other problem I see with inefficient "door to door" canvassing is that we only have very limiited manpower in our group. We are lucky if we can get 5 or more people to engage in this one day a week for 3 hours. They are trying to cover a number of Congressional districts that include about 600.000 or more voters. At the rate of their progress, I don't think they are going to reach more than approximately 1 or 2% of the people in our area if they do this every weekend until January.

I do not see how this is an efficient use of our resources. The "logic" used by the proponent of this is that we use registered voter data, and skip the Democrats since they are supposedly "less likely to switch parties to vote for Ron" in our closed primaries than are those registered Republican or Independent. I still don't see how this targetting makes up for the sheer inefficiency of door-to-door canvassing, especially during any time of the day other than dinner time (when more people are home).

However, my most important question is this.

I have been told by a second-hand source that this type of door-to-door precinct walking limited to registered voters on a list, has been allegedly pushed by the national campaign as the top priority, or one of the top priorities, for the meetup groups. Yet I have never personally seen or heard any such directive by anyone in the national campaign.

1) Has anybody here been told in writing or verbally by anyone in national that the local meetup groups should be putting our emphasis on door-to-door canvassing of our entire locale, using targetted voter registration lists to hit only Republicans and Independents?

2) Is your group doing this particular method of door-to-door canvassing of only Republicans and Independents using computerized voter registration lists? If so, to what degree, if any, is this particular activity, taking precedent over other types of activities, such as going distributing materials at crowded places, and/or roadside sign wavings?

3) If you have tried this, how time-effective do you find targetted door-to-door canvassing using voter registration lists?

Thank you for your feedback.

jasonhlasvegas2008
10-13-2007, 09:47 AM
Ultimately the strategy you choose depends on the election law in your State. My state, Nevada, is a Caucus state so it requires a slightly different strategy than an open or closed primary state. In our state only Republicans can participate in the Republican caucuses.

I have had 1 face-to-face meeting with the regional director for the southwest. The general strategy was outlined to me and this strategy included packing the precinct caucuses with as many Ron Paul supporters as possible.

What that means in practical terms is that just about everyone in my MeetUp group will have to run as a delegate for their specific precinct.

I was not given any specific instructions on how to accomplish this goal. The only specific advice that I was given was to make sure to write down the name, phone number, and address of every Ron Paul supporter who seemed interested participating in the precinct caucus.

It is my opinion that walking door-to-door in your precinct is the single most effective way to ensure that you will be elected as a delegate in your precinct. However, at this stage for my State walking door-to-door is not the most effective strategy. What I am doing right now is targeting specifically those people who registered as Libertarians and Independant Americans and who have not yet discovered Ron Paul's message. I have found that about 5% of these people end up becoming hardcore volunteers for my meetup group. I have until Dec. 19th to register these people as Republicans in my State. So I have decided to focus on them first by calling them and knocking on their doors.

This is the strategy that I think works best for a caucus State. In a Primary State doing the public outreach events I think are a much more effective use of your time. This is especially true in an Open Primary state where you do not need to strategize and coordinate with Ron Paul sympathizers quite as much as you do in a Caucus state.

Please feel free to comment or criticize.

Thanks!

Proemio
10-13-2007, 09:49 AM
Has headquarters pushed the idea of door-to-door canvassing?

Someone in my group mentioned that headquarters allegedly put out notice that they want the meetup groups to focus on door-to-door canvassing of homes.

...

Good rule of thumb: the campaign has many ways to drop a hint if they wish; not the least would be the man himself mentioning during the motivation part in a rally speech something like "Word is getting out. Now imagine, if all you well informed supporters would go and educate the potential electors on their kitchen table". Stuff like that.

It's alo good to remember that what TheCampaign wants is not necessarily what the doctor would prescribe. I realize that this sound heretical, but that is simply the way it is, because as the campaign grows, there is less time to communicate about the finer details.

Your best judgement about what a dash for liberty requires, is as good as any - nobody alive has any experience with such a thing. Reading the founders/revolutionaries can be a guide...

zahirakids
10-13-2007, 09:54 AM
Has headquarters pushed the idea of door-to-door canvassing?

Someone in my group mentioned that headquarters allegedly put out notice that they want the meetup groups to focus on door-to-door canvassing of homes.

I personally have never seen any such notice or directive from anyone in the national campaign leadership.

I am not too thrilled with the concept of door-to-door canvassing of homes because I don't think it is anywhere near as efficient as other methods.

Door to door canvassing requires walking time between homes, in San Francisco it often means walking up a flight of stairs in order to get to the doorbell, it often means waiting a minute or two to see if anybody answers the door, and during most of the day it means finding that there is nobody home and nobody there answering the door. Even if somebody answers, they may refuse to engage in any substantial discussion with you or take any literature from you.

Using voter registration lists adds another layer of inefficiency in terms of time, because you have to refer to the list before you go to your next house, and sometimes you skip a house on your list, and have to go back, and or have to cross the street each time because the lists are not in the order of a map.

To me it is a very inefficient way of meeting potential voters.

I find "canvassing" in crowds, such as fairs, concerts, conventions, parks, farmers' markets, and busy city areas where there are large crowds of people much more efficient than targetted door-to-door canvassing.

The other problem I see with inefficient "door to door" canvassing is that we only have very limiited manpower in our group. We are lucky if we can get 5 or more people to engage in this one day a week for 3 hours. They are trying to cover a number of Congressional districts that include about 600.000 or more voters. At the rate of their progress, I don't think they are going to reach more than approximately 1 or 2% of the people in our area if they do this every weekend until January.

I do not see how this is an efficient use of our resources. The "logic" used by the proponent of this is that we use registered voter data, and skip the Democrats since they are supposedly "less likely to switch parties to vote for Ron" in our closed primaries than are those registered Republican or Independent. I still don't see how this targetting makes up for the sheer inefficiency of door-to-door canvassing, especially during any time of the day other than dinner time (when more people are home).

However, my most important question is this.

I have been told by a second-hand source that this type of door-to-door precinct walking limited to registered voters on a list, has been allegedly pushed by the national campaign as the top priority, or one of the top priorities, for the meetup groups. Yet I have never personally seen or heard any such directive by anyone in the national campaign.

1) Has anybody here been told in writing or verbally by anyone in national that the local meetup groups should be putting our emphasis on door-to-door canvassing of our entire locale, using targetted voter registration lists to hit only Republicans and Independents?

2) Is your group doing this particular method of door-to-door canvassing of only Republicans and Independents using computerized voter registration lists? If so, to what degree, if any, is this particular activity, taking precedent over other types of activities, such as going distributing materials at crowded places, and/or roadside sign wavings?

3) If you have tried this, how time-effective do you find targetted door-to-door canvassing using voter registration lists?

Thank you for your feedback.

Door to door is the most affective strategy. Having run for office twice I can tell you that the people who win are the ones who do the most door to door. That is how you win.

jj111
10-13-2007, 09:54 AM
My personal feeling is that our group does not have the number of volunteers to make door-to-door targetted precinct walking an efficient method of getting the word out. We have 600,000 households with about average of 3 to 5 volunteers putting in 3 hours a week into this type of activity. (Only about 9 to 15 man hours per week). How the heck can we cover any substantial percentage of the homes in this huge city with such tortoise-like methods?

If I am going to do face to face contacting, I prefer working crowds: street fairs, farmers' markets, busy intersections, etc. That is because you can reach people in crowds about 10 times or 100 times more efficiently than walking up and down stairs, ringing bells, seeing nobody is home, checking your precinct list, and trying to find and walk to the next home.

I just don't think at this time, mid-October, the tortoise-speed, time-inefficient activity of door-to-door targetted precinct walking can have nearly the impact of more time-efficient activities such as tabling crowded events, and or roadside sign waving.

jasonhlasvegas2008
10-13-2007, 10:03 AM
Is your state a caucus or primary state. Is it open or closed?

jj111
10-13-2007, 10:03 AM
Door to door is the most affective strategy. Having run for office twice I can tell you that the people who win are the ones who do the most door to door. That is how you win.

How can you possibly make much of an impact with only 3-5 volunteers working 3 hours a week when often people are not even home when you ring the bell, and your voting area has 800,000 households? I don't see you reaching more than an estimated 7 voters per man hour using this method, especially if you go out in pairs rather than alone. That is only 105 voters per week with this method I estimate.

On the other hand, I can get all by myself 2000 to 4000 impressions per man hour by doing roadside sign waving. I can also get lots more than 7 impressions per hour by handing out flyers in a crowded place.

I just cannot convince myself of the relative benefit of going door to door this early in the campaign with so few volunteers.

erowe1
10-13-2007, 10:03 AM
I don't think that HQ puts very many orders or requests out to the grassroots, if ever. A request about what activities these independent meetup groups are to focus on could indirectly become a way of telling them how to spend money, which would cause FEC problems. My observation has been that HQ is happy to let the grassroots support groups do things their own way.

On door-to-door canvassing though, my group has recently started going specifically to homes that have yard signs for the Republican candidate in our upcoming mayoral election. This has been a good way of focusing on Republicans who have a high probability of voting in the primary, using our limited manpower for maximum payoff. So far the response has been really good.

Also, in my state of Indiana, our primary is not until May, and we are still at the stage of collecting signatures to get Paul on our ballot. So this door-to-door canvassing is serving that purpose at the same time.

jj111
10-13-2007, 10:04 AM
Our state is California. It is closed primary.

jj111
10-13-2007, 10:07 AM
California primary is closed and is Feb. 5, 2008.

Razmear
10-13-2007, 10:07 AM
Stand in a busy place and let them come to you, much more effective than knocking on doors, not to mention most folks don't like people knocking on their door selling them something, even if it is freedom.

eb

jasonhlasvegas2008
10-13-2007, 10:10 AM
If the California primary is closed and is on Feb. 5, 2008 then doing public outreach events is a superb idea. Just remember to bring registration forms so people can change their party affiliation, and bring a business card so that people can go directly to your meetup.com address to volunteer. In a primary state it is much less important to go door-to-door, and based on the size of your volunteer group you need to focus on recruiting more volunteers when you are at your public outreach events.

When you get more volunteers to join up then it will make much more sense to go door-to-door.

I think the strategy that you are employing now isn't bad at all and given the size of your meetup group it makes a great deal of sense.

That's my advice.

LibertyEagle
10-13-2007, 11:56 AM
Wasn't canvassing one of the things Anita (campaign consultant) was suggesting that we do?

jj111
10-13-2007, 12:02 PM
There is a difference between door-to-door canvassing targetted only to Republicans and Independents using voter registration printouts (slow like a tortoise) and canvassing at crowded venues such as farmers' markets, street fairs, concerts, etc.

So if Anita did suggest canvassing, was she specifically recommending door-to-door canvassing as the preferred method.

I like canvassing in large crowds, but on the other hand, I feel that door to door canvassing, skipping houses because you are targetting only those on your registration printout, and finding lot of people not at home or not interested, is slow as molasses and inefficient when you only have a handful of volunteers putting in only a handful of hours a week.

The distinction is between crowd canvassing and door to door targetted canvassing.

AZ Libertarian
10-13-2007, 12:28 PM
My State Coordinator Andre Campos (AZ/UT) and Regional Coordinator Jeff Greenspan are both pushing the door-to-door effort, but in all fairness, we in Phoenix have been planning this activity for months, but we had to wait until the temperatures came down to tolerable levels for our people. I had actually put up a thread on our message board and sent out an e-mail to the entire group announcing the "Family Walk for Ron Paul" strategy a week before HQ came to us and wanted volunteers. The only thing that gave this weekend a 'slow start' for HQ wanting to canvass is the "March Across America for Ron Paul" national event we have planned for today that has been in the works for two months! We have (hopefully) over 200 people Marching down Mill Avenue in Tempe, Az this evening, culminating at ASU Sun Devil Stadium where over 20,000 fans are expected for a Football Game for Champions Week! Otherwise, we'd be 'hitting the streets' in our door-to-door effort that will go into full swing next weekend. We will be preparing teams and mapping out precincts this week and will be ready to talk to the people! I believe there are two teams already out there this morning 'testing the waters' in North Phoenix (I haven't gotten a report back yet).
I know this kind of campaign would be difficult for some of the smaller Meetup Groups, but even with 400 registered members, we will still have our work cut out for us in a city of several million, BUT WE WILL NOT BE DETERRED! We are committed to do whatever it takes to SAVE AMERICA!

And that includes attempting the seemingly impossible.

Bradley in DC
10-13-2007, 12:30 PM
Door to door is the most affective strategy. Having run for office twice I can tell you that the people who win are the ones who do the most door to door. That is how you win.

Exactly.

katao
10-13-2007, 12:47 PM
Both strategies are good. Distributing materials at gun shows, etc. have benefits because you can target the message and are reaching likely receptive people.

But there are some other big benefits of canvasing (even though less efficient):

1. In states where precinct delegates are elected, you get a chance to meet your neighbors so they will be far more likely to vote for you.

2. You have time to answer questions and resolve concerns.

3. You can give them literature targeted to what information you find out about them. If they are democrats, give them a targeted democrat flier and the new slimjim, for example.

4. You can collect contact information for those who support RP. This can be used to ask them to be delegates, ask them to donate, remind them to vote, etc.

5. You can go back with yard signs and bumper stickers so that the Ron Paul support is much more visible in the area. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. You might even choose to canvas busy streets first, so you can get large signs in prominent locations.

When canvasing, be sure to pick times when people are more likely to be home - evenings, etc. Dress well. Don't be pushy - make the visit short and friendly.

ItsTime
10-13-2007, 01:06 PM
Big door to door on Oct 20th in and around Lebanon New Hampshire. Campaign asked us to do it so we are hehe.

Lyn
10-13-2007, 01:11 PM
We were told to have an anchor event such as sign wave in a busy intersection then to follow it up in the next 1-2 days with door to door canvassing in the immediate area. If possible to follow it up with telephone calls to that same area within the week. Supposedly, the three different exposures to the name RON PAUL over a short time cause an increase in name recognition and supposedly it has been proven to be effective. Our group has few people willing to go door to door so another member and I are doing what we can to cover a neighborhood or two in the area following a sign wave. I can see the logic and honestly we have had very positive responses. I always swore I would never, ever do this type of thing but if it will help get Dr. Paul elected I will do it. Remember even though we only hit a small number of people during each of these, if we get people on board then the results grow exponentially as they spread the word. Of course, we are doing the other venues (coin club, gun club, etc.) as well. Just my 2 cents.

kylebrotherton
10-13-2007, 03:16 PM
Canvassing (a.k.a. doorbelling) is one the most basic and fundamental functions of a grassroots campaign. To put it simply, campaigns that don't canvass don't win (with some exceptions). The manuals I've read show that canvassing is one of the most effective ways (if not the most effective way) of targeting voters.

Here are a few reasons why canvassing is so important:
1. Nothing shows local support like a local supporter showing up at your door.
2. It looks way less fringy than sign-waiving on a freeway.
3. You can see their current yard signs and bumper stickers, and better target them.
4. You get to put a flier in their hand, so they actually learn something about him.
5. The voters have a chance to ask questions about the candidate.
6. They can go online immediately, and learn more about the candidate.
7. It shows that Ron Paul volunteers are normal, intelligent people.
8. When you find local supporters, you can recruit them as volunteers in your group.
9. ... And you can come back to their house with a yard sign.
10. When you check a precinct off on your list, you know each home was contacted.

Even if there are only a few of you, get out there asap. With the help of two others, I've managed to canvass my entire neighborhood. It's so easy to spend an hour a day, three days a week, to spread the message of freedom to your neighbors. This has to be done. It's not an option.

Bruehound
10-13-2007, 03:25 PM
Door to Door campaigning is the only way to ever win an election at any level. Period, end of story.

katao
10-13-2007, 03:32 PM
I've read that as Ron Paul faced the challenge of winning in his district (against an incumbent) filled with farmers wanting government subsidies, he overcame it by going door-to-door meeting with folks and helping them to see how the subsidies actually hurt farmers more than they help. Face-to-face contact can be very powerful.

BirdsAreWild
12-03-2007, 07:45 PM
I think that door to door campaigning is the most effective means of getting voters. When I did not like someone who was on my County Council I ran against them. I had a few people who helped my canvas my precinct and I actually got 1/3 of the votes. That was a great record as I was an unknown female republican in a very democratic area. I did not win but his own party kicked him out at the next election. Door to dorr canvasing does work.

BirdsAreWild
12-03-2007, 07:46 PM
I think that door to door campaigning is the most effective means of getting voters. When I did not like someone who was on my County Council I ran against them. I had a few people who helped my canvas my precinct and I actually got 1/3 of the votes. That was a great record as I was an unknown female republican in a very democratic area. I did not win but his own party kicked him out at the next election. Door to dorr canvasing does work.

newyearsrevolution08
12-18-2007, 04:59 AM
Here is my take on the "belly to belly" issue that I am hearing. I have done sales and that is what we are doing. The door to door is GREAT only if YOU fit the stereotype that whoever behind the door wants to see. Too many people judge the message because of the messenger and because of that it can actually NOT be the best method as well as how annoying that "knock knock knock" is.

If you clean up well then you will be perfect for it, whether people admit it or not they FIRST look THEN listen and you need to be what they want to see FIRST.

I think instead of argueing over what is best, we need to focus on MANY different methods. Whether or not you like the canvassing idea or not just try it for a day or two and then you can go for the freeway overpass signs, corners of busy streets, football games and hand out "coupons of freedom" for instance.

reinhard
12-25-2007, 04:30 PM
See one of my posts regarding door-to-door canvassing. I am in California.
http://ronpaulexpo.com/because_I_owe_it_to_ron_paul