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SwordOfShannarah
02-17-2010, 02:37 PM
Who are the strongest libertarian party candidates out there that could run a U.S. Congress or U.S. Senate campaign?

Mary Ruwart and Michael Badnarick come to mind right away. Are there any others?

bucfish
02-17-2010, 03:00 PM
Christine Smith
http://lpcolorado.blogs.com/lpcolorado/2010/02/christine-smith-on-the-radio-and-in-the-newspaper.html

erowe1
02-17-2010, 03:02 PM
There's a guy who has run for Congress in Indiana as a Libertarian at least once (I think more), named Eric Schansberg, who has broken double digits in the general election. He's a professor of Economics, a devout Christian, is good at appealing to conservatives, and is fairly well-known and liked in libertarian circles. I think (though I'm not positive) that he's running again in 2010.

I think if Barr and Root would run for Congress as Libertarians rather than president (which might be something they'd consider condescending), they could both do very well.

Edit: Here's Schansberg's blog - http://schansblog.blogspot.com/
And there's an ad there for his campaign website, which has nothing on it. I don't know if it's 2 years old and he just hasn't taken it off his blog, or if he's running in 2010 and hasn't put anything on his campaign site yet. http://schansbergforcongress.com/

Pennsylvania
02-17-2010, 03:05 PM
I second Mary Ruwart. If she runs LP again in 2012, I'm swapping in my GOP primary vote for an LP one to get her the nomination this time (since she definitely got screwed out of it last time).

erowe1
02-17-2010, 03:07 PM
I second Mary Ruwart. If she runs LP again in 2012, I'm swapping in my GOP primary vote for an LP one to get her the nomination this time (since she definitely got screwed out of it last time).

You mean Libertarians are included in your tax payer funded primaries in Pennsylvania? I didn't think the LP did that.

Pennsylvania
02-17-2010, 03:08 PM
Hmm. Is it possible to vote in both then?

SwordOfShannarah
02-17-2010, 03:17 PM
My understanding is neither Mary Ruwart or Michael Badnarick could run for congress/Senate in 2010 because the filing deadline is past due in Texas.

Who are libertarian candidates that can run in 2010 and have a chance of winning?

erowe1
02-17-2010, 03:18 PM
Hmm. Is it possible to vote in both then?

I'm not intimately familiar with how the LP does it. I do know that here in Indiana, they are not on the ballot in our primary election. Indiana Libertarians exercise their say over who their candidates are completely via means working within the organization of the LP (which is the way it should be for all political parties, since they're private organizations). I assume that to be involved in that you have to be a dues paying member of the LP, and then you could vote in caucuses or a state convention on whom you will send as delegates to the national LP convention, where those delegates will elect the presidential and VP nominees for the party. If that is the case, then yes, I think in most states you could participate in that process as a Libertarian in addition to voting in your Republican or Democrat primary.

Flash
02-17-2010, 03:45 PM
He isn't a member of the LP but Jake Towne (independent) is polling 8%.

LibertyMage
02-17-2010, 04:17 PM
Lorenzo Gaztanaga is running for Maryland district 2.

http://www.md.lp.org/candidates/2/

He is actually coming to the next Baltimore Campaign for Liberty chapter meeting. I think the real problem is, Libertarian party members don't take races seriously. If they targeted specific districts where there was no republican challenger, campaigned actively and met people on the political ground they stood on, I really think they could take a few districts.

TCE
02-17-2010, 06:50 PM
Since you want big "L" Libertarians, Wayne Allyn Root should run for Mayor. From what I hear, he would stand a great shot. After that, he should run for Senate in 2012 to succeed John Ensign (R-NV) who will surely lose.

CaseyJones
02-17-2010, 06:53 PM
Ruwart is running for Comptroller in Texas

KCIndy
02-17-2010, 06:53 PM
I'm not intimately familiar with how the LP does it. I do know that here in Indiana, they are not on the ballot in our primary election. Indiana Libertarians exercise their say over who their candidates are completely via means working within the organization of the LP (which is the way it should be for all political parties, since they're private organizations). I assume that to be involved in that you have to be a dues paying member of the LP, and then you could vote in caucuses or a state convention on whom you will send as delegates to the national LP convention, where those delegates will elect the presidential and VP nominees for the party. If that is the case, then yes, I think in most states you could participate in that process as a Libertarian in addition to voting in your Republican or Democrat primary.


I'm unfamiliar with all the intimate details, but I do know that the Libertarian Party nominates their presidential candidate entirely within their national convention. They don't have state by state balloted primaries like the Democrats and Republicans.

TCE
02-17-2010, 07:20 PM
I'm unfamiliar with all the intimate details, but I do know that the Libertarian Party nominates their presidential candidate entirely within their national convention. They don't have state by state balloted primaries like the Democrats and Republicans.

This is correct. They have a round-by-round voting format where candidates are eliminated each round until one remains. It is common for an eliminated candidate to endorse a candidate still in the hunt for the nomination. Example: Wayne Allyn Root was eliminated but endorsed Bob Barr, in turn, Barr made him become the Vice Presidential nominee.

erowe1
02-17-2010, 07:30 PM
This is correct. They have a round-by-round voting format where candidates are eliminated each round until one remains. It is common for an eliminated candidate to endorse a candidate still in the hunt for the nomination. Example: Wayne Allyn Root was eliminated but endorsed Bob Barr, in turn, Barr made him become the Vice Presidential nominee.

Right. But there must be some process ahead of time that each state LP organization uses to select who gets to go there as a delegate right?

forsmant
02-17-2010, 08:03 PM
You mean Libertarians are included in your tax payer funded primaries in Pennsylvania? I didn't think the LP did that.

Thats usually because they only had 15 registered members and not out of principal.

Juan McCain
02-22-2010, 05:15 PM
I wonder if Christy Ann Welty wants to make another run at the U.S. Senate seat in Iowa (she did in 2004) -
the Grassley seat will be challenged, including in the Republican primary.

She was with us all at the first official visit of Ron Paul to the University of Iowa campus back in April 2007 -
months before the Iowa GOP straw poll of August that year.

Aiming big is good for the libertarians . . . confront the issues more, others would benefit in the long run.

Also . . . ya ' wonder who in the border states may be on the chopping block . . . ?

http://i372.photobucket.com/albums/oo161/sunblush/juanmccain01.jpg

.

Schiff_FTW
02-22-2010, 05:28 PM
What about Ed Thompson? He is the mayor of Tomah, Wisconsin and brother of former governor (current HHS secretary) Tommy Thompson.

YouTube - ED THOMPSON PART 1 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aubPaJrvSR8)
YouTube - ED THOMPSON PART 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-vKQYRUq4M)

edit: It looks like he is now running for a State Senate seat as a Republican.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Thompson

Thompson announced in October 2009 that he would run as a Republican for Wisconsin's 31st district State Senate seat in 2010, against incumbent Kathleen Vinehout.[6] The 31st District includes all of Trempealeau, Buffalo, Jackson and Pepin counties, and parts of Monroe, Pierce, Dunn, Eau Claire and Clark counties.[7]

Kludge
02-22-2010, 05:59 PM
Ruwart is running for Comptroller in Texas

Oooh, thanks. I hadn´t heard.

I see she´s still being attacked for her stance on anti-child-porn laws.

heavenlyboy34
02-22-2010, 07:03 PM
Nick Coons will be running this year. nickcoonsforcongress.com

rancher89
02-22-2010, 07:50 PM
Mike Beitler--outstanding Libertarian from NC--he is running against Richard Burr and whoever gets the Dem nod...

http://www.beitlerforussenate.org/

Nathan Hale
02-24-2010, 06:53 AM
I think, no matter how strong the libertarian candidate, we should encourage them to yield whenever there is a liberty republican in the race. Too often libertarians are so wrapped up in their party that they forget about the movement's greater good. In 2006 I argued back and forth for a month with a libertarian who insisted on running against Ron Paul of all people. So let's support libertarians when we can't get a major party liberty candidate, but lets put pressure on them to demure in their attempts if there is a more viable liberty candidate, especially if it promises to be a close race between the two legacy candidates.

J. W. Evans
02-26-2010, 09:25 PM
Here in Massachusetts, our Libertarian candidates are decided upon via the same type of ballots the MassGOP and Mass. Dems are elected upon.
This is because we are a major party in the state of Mass.

Of course, I'm not sure how many of you are familiar with the Massachusetts Libertarian Party.
We're interesting compared to the rest of the State affiliates and the national LP.
Notably in the fact our Party seems to constantly be disagreeing with the National LP regarding something most of the time, haha

As for successes,
We've had two Senate elections, one in 2000, one in 2002, where the Libertarian had a good showing.
In 2000, it was against the late Ted Kennedy, where it ended
Kennedy (D) - 72.69%
Robinson (R) - 12.86%
Howell (L) - 11.88%

and in 2002, it was Kerry against Cloud.
Kerry (D) - 80.03%
Forsberg (Write-in D) - 1.24%
Cloud (L) - 18.43%

I don't want to rabble on, but did you all know that due to recent events (running for Congress, running for Lt. Gov, etc.) our State legislature will now be 5% GOP in the Senate and 7.5% GOP in the House?

This is a fine time for Libertarians to work for office on the State level here at least, as Republican opposition is generally nothing.
My own town voted something close to 30% for the Libertarian when we had one running for State Senate (against a Democrat who is generally supported by both Dems AND well liked by a handful of GOP ((I work elections, and during the Primaries, he won the Dem. Nomination and had the most write-ins on the GOP no-candidate ballot, something like 20, which technically means he won that too, haha)

Recently though, some Mass Libertarians, including our candidate in the recent Special Elections ran as "Liberty" instead of "Libertarian"
This is even being encouraged by our State affiliate to a degree, as Massachusetts ballot laws are very harsh to the major Parties (Which the Mass LP is)

What about the rest of you all?
What are your states like?

Nathan Hale
02-26-2010, 09:40 PM
Don't let high vote totals from 2-way races cloud your judgment. When a libertarian wins 20% in a two way race, the LP often crows about popularity, but that's illusory. Any candidate in a 2-way race can win about 15-20% just by existing, because that 15-20% are the people who would rather anybody win than the other candidate on the ballot. It's noise, not an indicator.

J. W. Evans
02-26-2010, 10:10 PM
Don't let high vote totals from 2-way races cloud your judgment. When a libertarian wins 20% in a two way race, the LP often crows about popularity, but that's illusory. Any candidate in a 2-way race can win about 15-20% just by existing, because that 15-20% are the people who would rather anybody win than the other candidate on the ballot. It's noise, not an indicator.

Oh, of course, I know you're right.
Also, with regards to that three-way where the L and R are close, Jack E. Robinson's own website listed all of his flaws and life stories publicly in a big report that politically bludgeoned him to death in the end.

Speaking of 15% to 20% of the vote though,
Getting large percentages in Statewide races actually makes us not want to field candidates. We're choosing not to field candidates for Governor this time around because of that.
Because of how that works, Working Families and Green-Rainbow became Major Parties for 2008. Of course, the electoral rules are so brutal that if you don't have money and members, you get crushed. So, they, like us, will probably be gone again by 2012.
Hence "Liberty" Designation Candidates instead of Libertarian Party Candidates. At least for now.

tekkierich
02-26-2010, 10:18 PM
Lorenzo Gaztanaga is running for Maryland district 2.

http://www.md.lp.org/candidates/2/

He is actually coming to the next Baltimore Campaign for Liberty chapter meeting. I think the real problem is, Libertarian party members don't take races seriously. If they targeted specific districts where there was no republican challenger, campaigned actively and met people on the political ground they stood on, I really think they could take a few districts.

Mr. Gaztanaga is a good man. He and I both ran against Ruppersberger in 2008.

reardenstone
03-04-2010, 01:42 PM
I think, no matter how strong the libertarian candidate, we should encourage them to yield whenever there is a liberty republican in the race. Too often libertarians are so wrapped up in their party that they forget about the movement's greater good. In 2006 I argued back and forth for a month with a libertarian who insisted on running against Ron Paul of all people. So let's support libertarians when we can't get a major party liberty candidate, but lets put pressure on them to demure in their attempts if there is a more viable liberty candidate, especially if it promises to be a close race between the two legacy candidates.



Sounds rosy but neocons and tea partiers will try and shut us out. They only believe in freedom up to a certain extent which is their American exceptionalism beliefs: and I am a minarchist!

The LP has a broader image that can appeal to both sides if communicated from a place of compassion and not from disdainful urbaneness. Rp definitely has a populist message in his books but he is very much the constitutionalist libertarian.


Liberals likely to switch may repulse from the Republican name, but they would have less of a problem embracing social libertarianism.

Quinn Rogness
03-04-2010, 02:27 PM
I'm pretty sure Barr won't be able to run for congress due to crazy Georgia laws.

"Georgia: The legislature passed a law in 1943 requiring that new party and independent candidates submit a petition signed by 5% of the number of registered voters in order to get on the ballot for any office. Previously, any party could get on the ballot just by requesting it. The result has been that since 1943, there has not been one third party candidate on the Georgia ballot for U.S. House of Representatives. "

John Taylor
03-04-2010, 04:27 PM
Sounds rosy but neocons and tea partiers will try and shut us out. They only believe in freedom up to a certain extent which is their American exceptionalism beliefs: and I am a minarchist!

The LP has a broader image that can appeal to both sides if communicated from a place of compassion and not from disdainful urbaneness. Rp definitely has a populist message in his books but he is very much the constitutionalist libertarian.


Liberals likely to switch may repulse from the Republican name, but they would have less of a problem embracing social libertarianism.

This is a losing strategy for a simple reason. 30% of voters will vote for one of the two major parties regardless of the candidate's ideological makeup. I'm not kidding.

That means that you have about 40% of the population who will even consider voting for someone other than their party's standard bearer. Now, of that number, perhaps you have 30% who would support and vote for a straight up Libertarian. That means, that you have a viable Libertarian vote ceiling of 10% among voters nationwide... +/- fluctuations in races where one major party does not run a candidate etc...

Nathan Hale
03-04-2010, 09:30 PM
Sounds rosy but neocons and tea partiers will try and shut us out. They only believe in freedom up to a certain extent which is their American exceptionalism beliefs: and I am a minarchist!

We're seeing strong evidence that this isn't the case. The GOP is still going through its identity crisis, and liberty candidates are now "top tier", with many poised to represent the party this year.


The LP has a broader image that can appeal to both sides if communicated from a place of compassion and not from disdainful urbaneness. Rp definitely has a populist message in his books but he is very much the constitutionalist libertarian.

The LP's message right now is so far from the mainstream that it renders itself and irrelevant part of the political process. The tent is too small. If the LP went for a really big tent, underwent a huge marketing overhaul, and worked to build the house from the ground up rather than the roof down, I might, might, approve of using it as a viable method of electoral success. But right now it's just easier to run as Republicans.


Liberals likely to switch may repulse from the Republican name, but they would have less of a problem embracing social libertarianism.

There is no evidence that the LP is more capable of attracting liberals than the GOP, when the right candidate is fielded. We see it all the time. In 2000, Harry Browne's entire vote total was a quarter of the number of Democrats who voted for George Bush.