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View Full Version : Ron Paul On The Tea Party Phenomenom




angelatc
02-03-2010, 03:05 PM
http://insiderinterviews.nationaljournal.com/2010/02/ron-paul-on-the-tea-party.php

Video at the link.


In 2008, independents frustrated with establishment politics found a hero in Texas Republican Ron Paul. Warning voters about the dangers of an overstretched and overcommitted government, Paul provided today's Tea Partiers with a blueprint for grassroots success.

Republicans like Reps. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota and Mike Pence of Indiana, and Kentucky Senate candidate Rand Paul -- Ron's son -- have embraced the Tea Party movement. NationalJournal.com talked to Ron Paul last week about the energy of today's grassroots movements and the Republican Party's evolving relationship with the Tea Partiers.

Dianne
02-03-2010, 05:51 PM
All I know is we have to come up with a different idea, and this time spend a few bucks to copywright it.... or at least before John McCain and Lindsey Graham can take credit for creating the movement.

kpitcher
02-04-2010, 12:04 AM
What's wrong with the R3VOLution? I don't know who started using that first but it's the image that comes to mind first when I hear Ron Paul.

newbitech
02-04-2010, 12:16 AM
I thought this was an awesome response.


NJ: The Tea Party has evolved largely through citizen groups. But you also have the Nashville convention coming up, where Sarah Palin will be a central figure. How do you feel about her role in sort this movement that often prides itself as leaderless?


Paul: The question of a leaderless movement, I think that’s hard to totally conceive of. I can see an amorphous movement, where there’s not one single person that owns the movement. But I think there’s always a leader.
To me, the real leadership has to come philosophically in what you believe in, and certain individuals represent those views. But when it’s a philosophic movement, it can be amorphous. It can be spread out. To me, it’s sort of like asking, “Who’s the leader of the Keynesian economic philosophy?” Everybody’s a Keynesian in Washington because they believe in government intervention in the economy, but there’s no one single leader.