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Todd
11-23-2009, 02:32 PM
Sorry if this was posted before now. Couldn't find anything on it.

Link (http://www.accuracy.org/newsrelease.php?articleId=2130)



Huffington Post senior congressional correspondent Ryan Grim writes: "As the debate over an audit of the Federal Reserve intensifies in the House, one camp is trotting out eight academics that it calls a 'political cross section of prominent economists.' ... But far from a broad cross-section, the 'prominent economists' ... are in fact deeply involved with the Federal Reserve. Seven of the eight are either currently on the Fed's payroll or have been in the past."

And another link (http://www.dailypaul.com/node/115974)


As the debate over an audit of the Federal Reserve intensifies in the House, one camp is trotting out eight academics that it calls a "political cross section of prominent economists."

A review of their backgrounds shows they are anything but.

In a letter to the House Financial Services Committee earlier this month, all eight wrote that they support the type of amendment now being introduced by Rep. Mel Watt (D-N.C.). Watt's approach purports to increase Fed transparency while it actually would tighten restrictions on any audits that could go forward.

The letter was sent around Wednesday by Watt's staff to members of the committee in advance of a vote scheduled for Thursday.

Watt's measure is in competition with an amendment cosponsored by Reps. Ron Paul (R-Texas) and Alan Grayson (D-Fla.), which would repeal the restrictions that Watt leaves in place.

But far from a broad cross-section, the "prominent economists" lobbying on behalf of the Watt bill are in fact deeply involved with the Federal Reserve. Seven of the eight are either currently on the Fed's payroll or have been in the past.

The Fed connections are not outlined in the letter sent around to committee members on Wednesday, but are publicly discernible through a review of their resumes, which are all posted online.

In September, Huffington Post reported that the Federal Reserve has accomplished a soft form of effective control over the field of monetary economics simply by employing -- and being the means for career advance -- for an overwhelming proportion of the discipline.

The Deacon
11-23-2009, 02:42 PM
It's a "cross section" of multimillion dollar salaries that they're getting from the FED.