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View Full Version : New York Post: "DON'T GET THAT COLLEGE DEGREE!"




emazur
06-29-2009, 06:04 PM
http://www.nypost.com/seven/06282009/postopinion/opedcolumnists/dont_get_that_college_degree__176545.htm?page=0

Sean
06-29-2009, 11:46 PM
I kind of agree. I think college can be good or a waste. First I would always recommend going to a college that is inexpensive. Go somewhere where it will cost you at most a few thousand a year and not in the tens of thousands. Also go while working a job. You can easily go to college working full time. Also don't overlook going to an inexpensive community college for two years and then transferring to a four year school. This can save you a lot of money and you will still have a degree from the four year university.

Aurelia
07-02-2009, 11:06 AM
I very rarely tell anybody to go to college, or to finish college. The books are the same everywhere and it's overwhelmingly a waste of time. If you could cut all the busy work, the bureaucracy, and moronic required classes, you could save time, money, and sanity.

I think a lot of people tell kids to "get the sheepskin" and then you can do whatever you want, but I think that those few years crush a lot of people and teach you to extract the wrong lessons from life--paper pushing, memorizing for tests, etc. over saying screw the system, standards, and being your own person.

jclay2
07-02-2009, 11:16 AM
It all depends on what career you want to jump into, but like other posts have said DONT THROW $30,000 a year to get 15 hours of education a week for two thirds of the year. I do think for many people, a low cost college option (possibly including community college) is well worth it for a lot of careers.

eduardo89
07-02-2009, 06:48 PM
It really depends what you want to do in life...I personally am spending a fortune on my college education (20,000 tuition, plus around 30,000 for living expenses a year), but for what I want to do later in life, a bachelors and masters degrees are needed...

PS: I'm at a private university...i'd rather not go to college than go to a public institution!

emazur
07-02-2009, 07:05 PM
I very rarely tell anybody to go to college, or to finish college. The books are the same everywhere and it's overwhelmingly a waste of time. If you could cut all the busy work, the bureaucracy, and moronic required classes, you could save time, money, and sanity.

I think a lot of people tell kids to "get the sheepskin" and then you can do whatever you want, but I think that those few years crush a lot of people and teach you to extract the wrong lessons from life--paper pushing, memorizing for tests, etc. over saying screw the system, standards, and being your own person.

Agreed 100%, if it hasn't already happened by the end of high school it will happen in college. From Atlas Shrugged comes some of the most important words ever written:
There have always been men of intelligence who went on strike, in protest and despair, but they did not know the meaning of their action. The man who retires from public life, to think, but not share his thoughts - the man who chooses to spend his years in the obscurity of menial employment, keeping to himself the fire of his mind, never giving it form, expression or reality, refusing to bring it into a world he despises - the man who is defeated by revulsion, the man who renounces before he has started, the man who gives up rather than give in, the man who functions at a fraction of his capacity, disarmed by his longing for an ideal he has not found - they are on strike, on strike against unreason, on strike against your world and your values. But not knowing any values of their own they abandon the quest to know - in the darkness of their hopeless indignation, which is righteous without knowledge of the right, and passionate without knowledge of desire, they concede to you the power of reality and surrender the incentives of their mind- and they perish in bitter futility, as rebels who never learned the object of their rebellion, as lovers who never discovered their love.

Acala
07-16-2009, 04:41 PM
Unless you have a specific program in mind to acquire a useful skill that cannot be acquired any other way, I say don't go.

My daughter is starting college for nursing. I approve because inursing is a useful skill in an area that is likely to be in heavy demand for the foreseeable future, and a degree is required to practice it.

brandon
07-16-2009, 04:51 PM
Unless you have a specific program in mind to acquire a useful skill that cannot be acquired any other way, I say don't go.

My daughter is starting college for nursing. I approve because inursing is a useful skill in an area that is likely to be in heavy demand for the foreseeable future, and a degree is required to practice it.

Yep this is what it comes down to. Most 4 year degrees are totally worthless unless you continue into graduate school. Some notable exceptions are nursing and engineering.

Too many kids see college as just some mandatory extension of highschool where they get to study what interests them and go to cool parties on the weekends. Then when they hit their mid 20's, are 100 grand in debt, and just cant seem to find any employers looking to hire someone with a B.A. in liberal arts they realize it was a bad decision.

eduardo89
08-01-2009, 10:23 PM
Yep this is what it comes down to. Most 4 year degrees are totally worthless unless you continue into graduate school. Some notable exceptions are nursing and engineering.

Too many kids see college as just some mandatory extension of highschool where they get to study what interests them and go to cool parties on the weekends. Then when they hit their mid 20's, are 100 grand in debt, and just cant seem to find any employers looking to hire someone with a B.A. in liberal arts they realize it was a bad decision.

Liberal arts degrees are pretty useless unless you do a masters and actually focus on something

nayjevin
08-02-2009, 02:02 AM
There's a difference between a well rounded education -- culture, knowledge, exposure to the arts -- and learning what is necessary to perform a job.

Universities have mixed the two.

If I have a job, and the company can train me for it, I may still want an education. Nowadays, the Internet and travel can give it to me (provided I have learned self-discipline).

This is making it more and more difficult for universities to justify their existence. A successful new university model would focus EITHER on vocational education targeted to specific industry, OR a 'well rounded' education, at a reasonable price.

Largely, modern universities are simply failing at providing what companies want in an employee through their degree programs (with some exceptions, usually very focused degrees and vo-tech/lab study type programs).

It makes far more sense for a company to train its employees only what they need to know for the job to which they are hired - and choose whether to require evidence of a 'well rounded education' (diploma) as a requirement to hire.

0zzy
08-02-2009, 02:44 AM
I like college. I'm not going to be an engineer or a nurse, so it may be a waste. But I am going to a community college first two years (this will be my second year), then going to a University. It's quite cheap tuition-wise, compared to other schools, but the bad part is living. In California if you want to live in the dorms, you will be spending about 6000-8000 for two semesters (doesn't include summer), so, figure that per month.

I'll be double majoring in Business Administration with a concentration in Entertainment/Tourism Management + Radio-Television-Film, if I get my way that is. It will be good, I think, because the school I go to has a lot of connections for the jobs I want, so I learn from them, get an internship from their previous employer, and get a job :D. At least, that's my plan!

nayjevin
08-02-2009, 02:50 AM
I like college. I'm not going to be an engineer or a nurse, so it may be a waste. But I am going to a community college first two years (this will be my second year), then going to a University. It's quite cheap tuition-wise, compared to other schools, but the bad part is living. In California if you want to live in the dorms, you will be spending about 6000-8000 for two semesters (doesn't include summer), so, figure that per month.

I'll be double majoring in Business Administration with a concentration in Entertainment/Tourism Management + Radio-Television-Film, if I get my way that is. It will be good, I think, because the school I go to has a lot of connections for the jobs I want, so I learn from them, get an internship from their previous employer, and get a job :D. At least, that's my plan!

That formula can work, and you could turn a profit with it with a good job once debts are payed off.

A better model would allow that debt to be lower, and your education more focused for the job you actually obtain. I also find it a better goal to be working toward starting a business than working toward finding a job -- but that is a personal choice.

The experience of college is undeniably a valuable one - but in the current model it is way overpriced IMO.

Objectivist
08-02-2009, 03:05 AM
Wicked smart!
Here's a part of me...
YouTube - Good Will Hunting Harvard Bar Scene (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQezXbiroiE)

0zzy
08-02-2009, 03:07 AM
That formula can work, and you could turn a profit with it with a good job once debts are payed off.

A better model would allow that debt to be lower, and your education more focused for the job you actually obtain. I also find it a better goal to be working toward starting a business than working toward finding a job -- but that is a personal choice.

The experience of college is undeniably a valuable one - but in the current model it is way overpriced IMO.

It is way too priced, at least some schools are. CA is pretty cheap compared to others, they upped tuition recently and made everyone mad - but watchya gonna do, California budget problems and all :X. Cost of living in California is the suicidal part.

Anywhooo.

Mrs.Joe
08-02-2009, 09:12 AM
I am attending a community college because it is cheaper than going to a university, some may look down on that but oh well, the jobs dont seem to care. After that I will be attending a university for the second part of my BA degree in web design and IT. Around here you cant get a job unless you have a degree or are a carpenter...im not so big on the building things.

AgentOrange
08-15-2009, 01:25 PM
I agree that most college degrees are pretty meaningless in terms of educational value....except for the fact that many places of employment require a college degree. The fact that they don't care what the college degree is in, shows that the main point of a college degree is to show that someone was good at doing what they were to.

A college degree really has nothing to do with one's value as an employee....but many businesses won't give somebody a chance with out one. (This may possibly be due to so many high school graduates being unable to read--with a college degree it's much more likely that the person can actually read and perform basic math and what not.)