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travisAlbert
11-17-2008, 10:10 AM
I think that over Thanksgiving break I am going to pitch up a tent and live like a wild man. Does anybody have any tips on maintaining heat in a little tent, or any other advice for that matter.

pacelli
11-17-2008, 10:31 AM
What temperatures are you expecting?

Will you have a fire?

Will you have all of the food and water with you, or will you forage for everything?

Are you going by car/backpacking or will this be in your backyard?

FunkBuddha
11-17-2008, 10:42 AM
Go get a Nalgene water bottle. Boil water over the fire and pour into the bottle. Put the bottle in your sleeping bag an hour or so before bed time. It should stay nice and toasty all night.

Don't drink the water in the bottle. You can brush your teeth with it but don't drink it. The Nalgene bottles release Bisphenol when they are hot. I suppose drinking it once or twice won't hurt. I just don't like drinking it now that I know its unhealthy.

Also, try not to drink cold liquids. It takes a lot of calories to warm the liquid back up.

Oh, and eat a lot of fatty food an hour or so before bedtime.

And bring a good sleeping bag.

Truth Warrior
11-17-2008, 10:50 AM
You may want to just skip Valley Forge, PA. ;) Just a random thought. :D

travisAlbert
11-17-2008, 12:25 PM
What temperatures are you expecting?

Will you have a fire?

Will you have all of the food and water with you, or will you forage for everything?

Are you going by car/backpacking or will this be in your backyard?

The temperatures look to be 40's by day and 30's by night. I will be making a fire, and I do plan to bring water and some fruits and vegetables. I think that I am going to fish for food. I will be taking a car out to some timbered land that my dad owns. My primary concern is keeping warm through the night.

brandon
11-17-2008, 12:33 PM
The temperatures look to be 40's by day and 30's by night. I will be making a fire, and I do plan to bring water and some fruits and vegetables. I think that I am going to fish for food. I will be taking a car out to some timbered land that my dad owns. My primary concern is keeping warm through the night.

I think I am going camping this weekend as well.

If you have a good sleeping bag you will be fine during the night. Goto a sporting goods store and pick up a camping/backpacking sleeping bag. They are rated at different temperatures.

See here (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/index/index-display.jsp?id=cat20144&navAction=jump&navCount=1&cmCat=MainCatcat20075&parentType=category&parentId=cat20075)for listing of Cabella's sleeping bags.

Here is a typical sleeping bag. (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0014944515369a&navCount=2&podId=0014944&parentId=cat20144&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=MainCatcat20075-cat20144_TGP&catalogCode=UJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat20144&hasJS=true)You can buy it in three different models, one rated down to 20 degrees, one to 0 degrees, and one for -20 degrees. You should probably aim to get one rated at about 0 degrees, even though 20 degrees should really be fine for this weekend.

Also, bring a pair of long johns, and make sure you know how to start a good fire in cold wet conditions.

dannno
11-17-2008, 12:53 PM
Does anybody have any tips on maintaining heat in a little tent

Preferably a female.

pacelli
11-17-2008, 12:59 PM
The temperatures look to be 40's by day and 30's by night. I will be making a fire, and I do plan to bring water and some fruits and vegetables. I think that I am going to fish for food. I will be taking a car out to some timbered land that my dad owns. My primary concern is keeping warm through the night.

I think you'll be fine. As far as keeping warm through the night, the hot water bottle is a great idea. You could also try some of the charcoal flameless heater pads. 30 at night will feel like 20 without any wind.

I'd also recommend that you have a 0 degree sleeping bag, wear silk/polypro thermals (and socks), have a balaclava/face mask, as well as a padded eye mask. The eye mask & balaclava combo will allow you to keep your head out of your sleeping bag with only your nostrils exposed to the air, so you don't wake up wet in the morning from condensation from your breath. A 100% wool blanket will be helpful to have along in case you wake up shivering. First time cold weather campers tend to wake up shivering in the middle of the night. Just make sure you are prepared.

You should also have a well-sealed plastic bottle that you can use for fluid elimination so you don't have to crawl out of your tent in the middle of the night.

Also, when you set up your tent, make sure you know the general direction of the wind & be sure to set it up so that no tent openings are facing into the wind. You want to have some circulation in the tent throughout the night, but you don't want the full force of the wind blowing in.

angelatc
11-17-2008, 01:26 PM
I think that over Thanksgiving break I am going to pitch up a tent and live like a wild man. Does anybody have any tips on maintaining heat in a little tent, or any other advice for that matter.

Bring your dog! They're nice and warm! ALso a decent sleeping bag.

Andrew-Austin
11-17-2008, 01:29 PM
I think that over Thanksgiving break I am going to pitch up a tent and live like a wild man. Does anybody have any tips on maintaining heat in a little tent, or any other advice for that matter.

Throw some stones in the fire for a little bit, then put them on the inside edges of the tent.

angelatc
11-17-2008, 03:32 PM
Throw some stones in the fire for a little bit, then put them on the inside edges of the tent.

How the heck do you pick them out of the fire? And rocks will explode, sending shrapnel everywhere if you're not careful.

cbc58
11-17-2008, 03:49 PM
coleman used to make an in-tent heater... not sure if they still do and I'll bet you could find one on ebay.

we went camping last weekend and it was 32 degrees at night. loved it. cold but great to get out.

i want to build one of these if I can find some land... camp year round: www.sweetwaterbungalows.com

jacmicwag
11-17-2008, 03:53 PM
Check with Shem Dog. He's probably got some good ideas :)

hillbilly123069
11-17-2008, 03:57 PM
I think that over Thanksgiving break I am going to pitch up a tent and live like a wild man. Does anybody have any tips on maintaining heat in a little tent, or any other advice for that matter.
Watch Man vs Wild or Survivorman on the Discovery Channel.Your 1 stop answer shop.

FunkBuddha
11-17-2008, 04:21 PM
i want to build one of these if I can find some land... camp year round: www.sweetwaterbungalows.com

I want one of these. (http://www.reesetipis.com/index.cfm)

Matt Collins
11-17-2008, 07:46 PM
Throw some stones in the fire for a little bit, then put them on the inside edges of the tent.ABSOLUTELY NOT! This is very bad advice.

A nylon tent will melt or go up in flames instantly. Other tents could very possible catch fire at worst, at best, it will ruin the waterproofing chemical that has been sprayed on it.

Ninja Homer
11-17-2008, 07:55 PM
30 degrees isn't that bad. A lot depends on the tent. If it's just a single-person tent you'll heat it up pretty quickly just with body heat. It may be a problem if it is well ventilated (like an A-frame made for summer camping) and there's a strong wind to blow away the heat. If that's the case, you can attach a tarp over one end of it, and it should cut out the wind, but still allow for some ventilation.

You shouldn't need to go out and buy a sub-zero sleeping bag for 30 degrees. Bring a couple extra blankets just in case. If you use a sub-zero sleeping bag, you're likely to wake up in a puddle of sweat. Layers are good.

Get your body off the cold ground with a foam pad, air mattress, or cot.

Some quality long underwear wood be a good thing. You'll probably have a harder time staying warm outside in 40 degrees than in the tent at 30 degrees.

Hot rocks will help, but nylon tents melt easy. Rocks don't explode very often, and it usually only happens with rocks you take out of a river or lake bottom.

Matt Collins
11-17-2008, 08:02 PM
My primary concern is keeping warm through the night.Buy a cold-weather sleeping bag that is designed to be used in sub-zero weather (you can cover your entire body + head in it), and then sleep butt naked EXCEPT for a ski hat. That's what all of the pro hikers do.

Dr.3D
11-17-2008, 08:10 PM
Buy a cold-weather sleeping bag that is designed to be used in sub-zero weather (you can cover your entire body + head in it), and then sleep butt naked EXCEPT for a ski hat. That's what all of the pro hikers do.

Good advise....

I bought one of these...
http://store.colemans.com/cart/images/3093.jpg

Don't even need a tent and you can sleep in the snow if necessary or in the rain.

http://store.colemans.com/cart/us-gi-modular-sleep-system-mss-p-1326.html

Edit: Mine cost me more then $300 when I got it so the one at that web site is a darned good deal. Would probably be the last sleeping bag you would ever need.

Edit 2: Don't forget a good self inflating air mattress. You don't want to be on the ground.

ShowMeLiberty
11-17-2008, 08:14 PM
... make sure you know how to start a good fire in cold wet conditions.

My husband and I found that the best way to start a fire on cold, damp mornings is with fire starter sticks (any grocery or big box store should have them) and the battery-powered air pump used to inflate/deflate an air mattress.

Once you have the fire starter sticks going and you start adding your firewood, use the air pump to blow air on the fire until the wood catches and is burning well. You can get as big and hot a fire going as you need.

It also helps if you can keep at least a dozen or so sticks of firewood dry overnight. Use those to get the fire going well and you can add damp wood afterward with no problem.

pacelli
11-17-2008, 08:38 PM
Anything you'll use to start your fire in the morning should either be put in the car or under your tent or a tarp. Don't harvest frozen wood from the forest, it will not burn. If there are crystals inside the wood when you cut it open, don't waste your energy on it.

Matt Collins
11-17-2008, 08:51 PM
Here is a good list of people to ask this question to:
http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?t=46430&highlight=eagle+scout

travisAlbert
11-19-2008, 11:54 AM
All of you have been extraordinarily helpful. I appreciate all of your advice.

Allen72289
11-19-2008, 01:37 PM
Keep a clean campsite

If there are bears around DO NOT burn food stuffs, it attracts them.

Place all garbage in an air tight container with ammonia (bears hate the smell)

hoist the garbage in a bucket over a tree.

Hoist the food in a bucket over a tree as well

keep all food in garbage 300 feet down wind of camp

never bring foodstuff in your tent or clothing with the smell

keep metal objects to banh on because of bears

if this is just the weekend I would recommend a good sleeping bag because you'll waste your time building a fire pit under the tent which will take a day.

If you're camping out for several weeks I recommend obtaining a barrel and stove pipe for a buried fire pit in which you place the tent over it.

or a wall tent & stove

30 degrees aint nothing. I camped out when it was 19 degrees with 3 layers of clothing, insulated overalls and two sleeping bags

gls
11-19-2008, 01:41 PM
If there are bears around DO NOT burn food stuffs, it attracts them.

Place all garbage in an air tight container with ammonia (bears hate the smell)

hoist the garbage in a bucket over a tree.

Hoist the food in a bucket over a tree as well

keep all food in garbage 300 feet down wind of camp

never bring foodstuff in your tent or clothing with the smell

keep metal objects to banh on because of bears



http://www.trojanwire.com/football/images/colbert-bears-threatdown.jpg

Allen72289
11-19-2008, 01:43 PM
http://www.trojanwire.com/football/images/colbert-bears-threatdown.jpg

:o I've met black bears and they aren't fun

ihsv
11-19-2008, 08:04 PM
Just a thought, but maybe get a metal container, put coals from the fire in it, and place it in the tent with you... away from any combustibles. Somfin werf think'n 'bout.

axiomata
11-19-2008, 08:52 PM
I went camping last weekend. I love cold camping. With a good sleeping bag you should be fine. Don't wear cotton, especially cotton socks. My feet get poor circulation and are the only part of my body that ever gets cold. I tend to throw a fleece blanket around my feet or wear down slippers. The nalgene bottle with hot water sounds like a good idea, but I'd stay away from any other heat source. Nylon tents don't like heat. Make sure you can "lock" your sleeping bag zippered up. with velcro or something The cheaper one's will become unzipped as you move throughout the night and you'll let all your body heat out and freeze.

Make sure you keep your wood dry, and have enough for the night. And make sure you are good at making fires. Canned beef stew is a great winter camping dinner. Hot and fatty.

Matt Collins
11-19-2008, 09:09 PM
make sure you keep your wood dryha ha ha!

pacelli
11-19-2008, 10:04 PM
ABSOLUTELY NOT! This is very bad advice.

A nylon tent will melt or go up in flames instantly. Other tents could very possible catch fire at worst, at best, it will ruin the waterproofing chemical that has been sprayed on it.

+1, never put any heat source directly on a tent.

Dr.3D
11-19-2008, 10:42 PM
+1, never put any heat source directly on a tent.

Yep, even my military command post tent has to have a sand box for the stove it has in it. The stove pipe goes up through a silicon ring that keeps the fabric of the tent from catching fire. And of course one has to have a spark arrester in the pipe to keep hot embers from coming out the top of the stove pipe and landing on top of the tent.

Bryan
11-19-2008, 11:01 PM
I've done a ton of cold weather camping- here's my $0.02 (some cut and paste from others):


Equipment:

Get a good 20* or 30* bag that is not a rectangular cut or made of cloth -- IMO, you don't need a mummy cut at this temp-- I prefer a semi- rectangular for the best balance of warmth vs. room.

Get a closed cell foam sleeping pad (like a therarest- under $20). 3/4 body length is fine.

Pretty much any tent that will keep you dry will do.


Clothes:

Wear a good fleece hat.
Wear silk/polypro thermals (and socks) -- if needed


Food:

Oh, and eat a lot of fatty food an hour or so before bedtime.

Also, try not to drink cold liquids. It takes a lot of calories to warm the liquid back up.

If bears are not an issue, keep a snack next to your bag. It's easy for you to run to empty and then you get cold (at 2-4AM) since you have no fuel for the internal furnace.


Others:

Clean feet stay warm better.

Build up some heat (from exercise) before getting in your bag- this will help you warm it up.

You should also have a well-sealed plastic bottle that you can use for fluid elimination so you don't have to crawl out of your tent in the middle of the night.

But as said, 30* isn't bad- you should be fine if you have the basics (bag and pad).

Allen72289
11-19-2008, 11:21 PM
Use a wood like western cedar for kindling and bark for tender.

Gradually build your fire.

Ninja Homer
11-20-2008, 11:39 AM
I don't know if it has been mentioned, and it probably goes without saying, but bring rain gear! If you get wet when it's cold out, it's very hard to get warm and dry again. The best bet for getting warm and dry again would be to stay in the car with the heat on until you get dry and your core warms up.

When I'm camping near my car, I'll usually bring a little Weber Smokey Joe charcoal grill and enough charcoal for the trip. When I'm done cooking a meal, I dump the hot coals into the fire pit and start a fire on top of it. It's almost impossible to not get a fire going when you're starting with a hot bed of coals.

Bring a bundle of dry wood along so you know you'll have at least enough to get a fire started. Then collect wood that you'll be burning later, and use it to build your fire ring. It should dry out pretty quickly this way. If your fire pit isn't in any danger of starting a forest fire, you can leave it going over night, and you should have some hot coals left in the morning to build a fire on.

Keep a pot of water near the fire and use it as your drinking water. Keep filling it as you drink it. Hot water tastes amazingly good when you're cold.

If your core body temperature is fine, but your hands or feet are cold, drinking a shot of alcohol (brandy, bourbon, whatever) will help to move some of your core body heat to your hands and feet. This isn't recommended for a survival situation, but for warming up hands and feet when you aren't in any real danger, it works great.

tangent4ronpaul
12-02-2008, 08:08 AM
How the heck do you pick them out of the fire? And rocks will explode, sending shrapnel everywhere if you're not careful.

Rocks only explode if they are river rocks. Rocks from dry land are fine.

As to getting them out - they should be lining the outskirts of a fire pit or warmed in the ashes/embers - get them out when wearing leather gloves (sometimes a stick helps) and wrap in a piece of cloth.

-t

tangent4ronpaul
12-02-2008, 09:04 AM
If you are used to being inside, a night outside isn't going to be that pleasant. This sort of things works much better if your body is outside most of the time and adapts to the changing seasons through fall, then winter.

Anyway, dress in layers - shed some when too hot, and add some when too cold. The worst thing you could do is wear one of those heavy ski parka's.
A hat is your most important tool for staying warm - most heat is lost through the head.
Insulating what you sit or lie on is next in importance. A bed of pine needles is fine, a sleeping pad a luxury.
Wet clothing will steal body heat via evaporation. Polyester has a good reputation for insulating even when wet and dries out quick. Snow will also absorb water like a sponge so a good tool to get clothing un-wet. Snow is also a wonderful form of insulation and can be a not bad building material.
Bring extra socks!
You can get by just fine with a blanket or two and a tarp / 550 cord instead of a sleeping bag and tent. You can get by with using fallen branches to construct a framework then collecting and piling on leaves or pine needles and bark to make a shelter. This will take hours - plan ahead. People have survived by building a pile pf pine needles then burrowing inside - like a caccoon. umm - pictures!

http://www.wilderness-survival-skills.com/outdoorsurvivalshelter.html

When you find good kindling material, place it between layers of your clothing to dry out via body heat. If you don't have layers of clothing put pine needles/insulating material between your shirt/pants and skin to create them.

If you are counting on catching fish for food - expect to go hungry.

"Indian make small fire and sit close, white man make big fire and sit far" - just something to keep in mind when searching for firewood...

Boiling water will kill guiardia - NO FUN!, and adding some pine needles will make a nice tea. Morning dew and fresh fallen snow will be free of parasites. Melt snow before using or you will lower your core temperature. Lacking water treatment, and underground spring is your best bet for getting uncontaminated water.

You can get by just fine with nothing more than the clothes on your back and a sheath knife if you know how. I would add a flint and steel after that, but you don't really NEED it to make a fire.

This is a classic book on the subject:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/morriconei/3075580008/

It's available used all over for cheap. try http://used.addall.com

hope that helps,

-t