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FrankRep
11-09-2008, 11:55 AM
Gov. Gary Johnson for President in 2012?


Gov. Gary Johnson, former Governor of New Mexico, is reportedly weighing a run for President in 2012 against Barack Obama. Gary Johnson is a true conservative with libertarian leanings, in the tradition of Jeff Flake, Ron Paul, and Barry Goldwater. This group is being created to encourage a man of outstanding character to put his name in the race.

Gary Johnson was the Republican Governor of New Mexico from 1995-2003. Gov. Johnson was elected twice, in a traditionally blue state, by margins of 10% each time. In 1999, Johnson became the highest-ranking elected official in the United States to advocate the legalization of drugs and the end of the War of Drugs, which he called an "expensive bust".

Since leaving office, Gary Johnson has remained an outspoken critic of the War on Drugs, of the War in Iraq, and of our current Monetary Policy. Known for being an athlete, he ran in a number of triathalons during his tenure as Governor of New Mexico, and in 2003 he climbed Mt. Everest, the highest peak in the world. In the 2008 Republican Presidential primary, Gov. Johnson endorsed Internet-phenomenon Ron Paul.


Gary Johnson at the Rally for the Republic:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2EhAVQS2V8

AJ Antimony
11-09-2008, 11:57 AM
Aren't there like 5000 threads on this already?

ItsTime
11-09-2008, 12:02 PM
Gov. Gary Johnson for President in 2012?


Gov. Gary Johnson, former Governor of New Mexico, is reportedly weighing a run for President in 2012 against Barack Obama. Gary Johnson is a true conservative with libertarian leanings, in the tradition of Jeff Flake, Ron Paul, and Barry Goldwater. This group is being created to encourage a man of outstanding character to put his name in the race.

Gary Johnson was the Republican Governor of New Mexico from 1995-2003. Gov. Johnson was elected twice, in a traditionally blue state, by margins of 10% each time. In 1999, Johnson became the highest-ranking elected official in the United States to advocate the legalization of drugs and the end of the War of Drugs, which he called an "expensive bust".

Since leaving office, Gary Johnson has remained an outspoken critic of the War on Drugs, of the War in Iraq, and of our current Monetary Policy. Known for being an athlete, he ran in a number of triathalons during his tenure as Governor of New Mexico, and in 2003 he climbed Mt. Everest, the highest peak in the world. In the 2008 Republican Presidential primary, Gov. Johnson endorsed Internet-phenomenon Ron Paul.


Gary Johnson at the Rally for the Republic:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2EhAVQS2V8

Wheres the source?

socialize_me
11-09-2008, 12:11 PM
Wheres the source?

www.google.com

FrankRep
11-09-2008, 12:24 PM
Facebook | Gov. Gary Johnson for President in 2012

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=13200515790#/group.php?gid=47914490803&ref=nf

nate895
11-09-2008, 12:37 PM
Up in "2012 planning" I am conducting a poll on who we should draft for President in 2012. Gary Johnson looks like he will be the winner. As soon as he reaches a majority (probably after this round), and we can find people to fill all the positions needed (or at least most of them), we will start an official Draft PAC for him.

Dorfsmith
11-09-2008, 02:06 PM
I like Gary. The only thing that concerns me is this from the following article:

http://libertymaven.com/2008/11/08/ron-paul-liberty-torch-to-be-handed-to-gary-johnson/3121/

"Questions Regarding Voting Record

Johnson was sometimes referred to as “Veto Johnson” while Governor. That is music to many Ron Paul supporter’s ears who will immediately think of Paul’s own “Dr. No” moniker. Unfortunately, there is at least one vote that should concern Paul supporters and libertarians.

Ron Paul takes pride in saying that he would never vote to regulate the Internet, even in the case of perceived “positive” regulation such as Net Neutrality. Likewise, Paul refuses to regulate the “bad” or “obscene” things on the Internet. In essence, he wholeheartedly supports the First amendment of the Constitution. Unfortunately, this has not been the case for Gary Johnson.

The ACLU brought a suit against the state of New Mexico and Gary Johnson in 1998 for signing a bill that makes it a crime to disseminate material over the Internet that is “harmful to a minor.” In fact, according to the ACLU web site the law was blocked via judicial order on Constitutional grounds. While this law was likely lauded by “family values” Republicans it is obviously a major problem for strict Constitutionalist libertarians.

Johnson is also a big proponent of school vouchers, which take tax money and distribute it to school age families to help pay for schooling. However, It is unclear if he would support such a program at the federal level."

nate895
11-09-2008, 02:11 PM
I like Gary. The only thing that concerns me is this from the following article:

http://libertymaven.com/2008/11/08/ron-paul-liberty-torch-to-be-handed-to-gary-johnson/3121/

"Questions Regarding Voting Record

Johnson was sometimes referred to as “Veto Johnson” while Governor. That is music to many Ron Paul supporter’s ears who will immediately think of Paul’s own “Dr. No” moniker. Unfortunately, there is at least one vote that should concern Paul supporters and libertarians.

Ron Paul takes pride in saying that he would never vote to regulate the Internet, even in the case of perceived “positive” regulation such as Net Neutrality. Likewise, Paul refuses to regulate the “bad” or “obscene” things on the Internet. In essence, he wholeheartedly supports the First amendment of the Constitution. Unfortunately, this has not been the case for Gary Johnson.

The ACLU brought a suit against the state of New Mexico and Gary Johnson in 1998 for signing a bill that makes it a crime to disseminate material over the Internet that is “harmful to a minor.” In fact, according to the ACLU web site the law was blocked via judicial order on Constitutional grounds. While this law was likely lauded by “family values” Republicans it is obviously a major problem for strict Constitutionalist libertarians.

Johnson is also a big proponent of school vouchers, which take tax money and distribute it to school age families to help pay for schooling. However, It is unclear if he would support such a program at the federal level."

With such vague language, I might have read it as an anti-child porn bill. If that is the case, I would also have signed the bill as child porn is obviously a crime with a clear victim.

As for school vouchers, I am in favor of them as well, I don't know why that would be a deal breaker for Paulers.

itshappening
11-09-2008, 02:35 PM
Great to see some primary planning taking place, we need to show Johnson that he has support if he chooses to do this!

itshappening
11-09-2008, 02:37 PM
'In fact, according to the ACLU web site the law was blocked via judicial order on Constitutional grounds. While this law was likely lauded by “family values” Republicans it is obviously a major problem for strict Constitutionalist libertarians.'
---------

that's the Republic in action is it not? we believe in States rights and that includes NM's right to pass whatever laws they want but that doesn't mean they can't be challenged in court!

Elwar
11-10-2008, 02:52 PM
Reason: Let’s talk about another controversial program that you have been pushing hard: school vouchers. What is your program, how have you been selling it, and what audience has been the most receptive?

Johnson: What I’ve proposed is that every single K–12 student in the state of New Mexico, all 300,000 of them, get a voucher to attend whatever school they want. The value of the voucher would be about $3,500. That’s my proposal.

I have taken this on the stump, and I will continue to take it on the stump for the next two and a half years. I have talked to any group that will ask me to come talk about vouchers. Same, by the way, when it comes to drugs. So I think New Mexico is getting better and better educated on vouchers. After a couple of years on this issue, the needle has moved. No question about it, the needle has moved! Has it gone far enough? No. All you can do is keep going, going, going.

Reason: Why is it so hard to get vouchers passed?

Johnson: The biggest criticism is that it will take money away from public schools, that it will destroy the public school system. My plan would actually increase the per capita funding for kids who remain in public schools.

We are actually spending about $5,500 dollars per child, and each public school district would get the $2,000 differential for each student who opted out. The example I use is this: Say that every student in Santa Fe were to opt out of public schools, which isn’t possible and is not going to happen. But if it did, Santa Fe public schools would be left with about 40 percent of their budget and no students. Tell me how that takes away from public education.

Reason: How do your opponents deal with that?

Johnson: I don’t think they do. It’s one of those pins in the balloon. Go down the list of the main criticisms: Vouchers only favor the rich. Baloney! People with money live in good neighborhoods that have good schools. Give me a break. Vouchers are for the poor. Vouchers are for those that don’t have money, who live in the worst neighborhoods, go to the worst schools, and can’t get away from them.

Keep going down the list: Vouchers are unconstitutional because you’re giving money to private schools. No. If you want to start calling vouchers unconstitutional, then every single state has got a lot of unconstitutional programs. We give low-income parents money so they can go take their child to child care. We don’t tell them where to take their child. The examples go on and on. You can just go on and on with the criticisms and the rebuttals of the criticisms.

Reason: Why are vouchers important? Why not just fix the public schools?

Johnson: Since I have been governor, K–12 educational spending has gone from $1.1 billion a year to $1.6 billion a year. By all measurements, students are doing just a little bit worse from year to year. For all that money, shouldn’t we be doing just a little bit better? All I suggest is to make K–12 like higher education. Higher education in the United States is the best in the world because these institutions compete with each other for your tuition dollar. Let’s just bring competition to public education. This is not about getting rid of public education; it is about providing alternatives that public schools very, very quickly will react to. Public schools will get better if they are subject to competition.

Reason: What role do charter schools play in injecting competition into the system?

Johnson: This last year we passed a comprehensive charter schools act. Great! This is a way for public schools to become better. Add vouchers. Give every single student in the state of New Mexico a voucher, and charter schools will become the vehicle by which public schools compete. Pass vouchers, and every single school will become a charter school overnight.