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raystone
02-02-2008, 09:11 PM
Feb 2, 9:02 PM EST


In youth forum, Obama says background helps him understand world, Clinton pitches college aid

By PHILLIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer



NEW YORK (AP) -- Democrat Barack Obama told young voters Saturday his multicultural background lets him "see through the eyes of other people" abroad in ways another president could not. Closer to home - and student pocketbooks - rival Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke of aggressive steps to make college affordable.

The two Democrats and Republicans Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul joined in a youth-oriented forum sponsored by MTV, The Associated Press and MySpace, each fielding questions separately by satellite. In perhaps a sign of Obama's strength with young people, both Clinton and Huckabee were asked not just about themselves, but about him.

Clinton, asked what Obama symbolized in the contest, said she and her rival together "represent such a sea change in America" - one bidding to become the first female president, the other wanting to be the first black president. "Whichever of us gets the nomination, we are making history," she said, before rapidly asserting she is the best equipped to lead.

Equally mindful of history, Obama declared the contest is not about the race or the sex of the candidates. If it were just about his race, he said, "I wouldn't have to answer questions. I could just show up."

Clinton was in Tucson, Ariz., and Obama in Minneapolis, each in motion across a vast landscape in the closing stretch before the two dozen presidential nomination contests Tuesday. John McCain and Mitt Romney, top contenders for the GOP nomination, declined to participate in the forum. McCain answered questions solo at an MTV-MySpace forum from New Hampshire in December.

Obama, an Illinois senator, asked young voters concerned about America's place in the world to judge him on his record of standing against the Iraq war and on his background as the son of a Kenyan father and mother from Kansas. He noted his schooldays in Indonesia.

"If I convene a meeting of Muslim leaders to try to bridge the divide between Islam and the West, I do so with the credibility of someone who lived in a Muslim country for four years when I was a child," he said. "And although I'm a Christian I have a sense of that culture."

He said his supporters were diligently countering an anonymous e-mail campaign painting him as a Muslim, a faith he's never practiced.

"I am a member of the same Christian church where I've been for the last 20 years," he said. "I've been pledging allegiance to the flag since I was 3 years old. These are the old smear tactics that we see in every campaign."

Clinton, a New York senator, emphasized college affordability in response to a question, and outlined her proposals to help students pay off debt with national service, to increase Pell grants and to sweeten other college aid.

She said student loan companies should be cut out of the process and colleges should enter contracts with freshmen ensuring no tuition increases until they graduate.

"We are literally slamming the door of college in the face of so many young people," she said. Obama, too, talked about his national service plan to relieve college debt.

Huckabee, opening the forum, complained that he always gets "the God questions" when he'd rather be talking about public policy, and denied there's any conflict between his faith and the right things to do as president.

The former Baptist preacher was asked almost right off if he would be capable of making decisions in the Oval Office that might be at odds with his religion.

"There's not this glaring conflict," he said. "Faith helps me to understand what is right."

Religious conservatives have provided much of Huckabee's support and he's not been shy about courting them.

"I always get asked the God questions," he said, adding that "it's really been frustrating" that people don't want to know more about his work as Arkansas governor.

Paul told the forum he opposed U.S. intervention in Sudan's Darfur region and placed little faith in the ability of the United Nations to relieve the crisis there. He was asked what he'd do to stop the crisis from turning into a genocide on the scale of that experienced in Rwanda.

"I don't believe in using force in that manner," he said. "Under the Constitution, we're not allowed to do that."

He said he might support some interim aid, steered through international agencies, to address "these social problems in Africa." The U.N. estimates that 200,000 people have died and 2.5 million have been displaced since ethnic African rebels in Darfur took up arms against the Arab-dominated central government, accusing it of discrimination, in 2003

Huckabee spoke from Montgomery, Ala., and Paul from Victoria, Texas.

The forum, "Closing Arguments: A Presidential Super Dialogue," was presented live on MTV and more than 1,800 Web sites and radio stations. Questions came from moderators in MTV's Times Square studio and from online and in-studio participants.

---

Mckarnin
02-02-2008, 09:14 PM
Feb 2, 9:02 PM EST


In youth forum, Obama says background helps him understand world, Clinton pitches college aid

By PHILLIP ELLIOTT
Associated Press Writer



NEW YORK (AP) -- Democrat Barack Obama told young voters Saturday his multicultural background lets him "see through the eyes of other people" abroad in ways another president could not. Closer to home - and student pocketbooks - rival Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke of aggressive steps to make college affordable.

The two Democrats and Republicans Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul joined in a youth-oriented forum sponsored by MTV, The Associated Press and MySpace, each fielding questions separately by satellite. In perhaps a sign of Obama's strength with young people, both Clinton and Huckabee were asked not just about themselves, but about him.

Clinton, asked what Obama symbolized in the contest, said she and her rival together "represent such a sea change in America" - one bidding to become the first female president, the other wanting to be the first black president. "Whichever of us gets the nomination, we are making history," she said, before rapidly asserting she is the best equipped to lead.

Equally mindful of history, Obama declared the contest is not about the race or the sex of the candidates. If it were just about his race, he said, "I wouldn't have to answer questions. I could just show up."

Clinton was in Tucson, Ariz., and Obama in Minneapolis, each in motion across a vast landscape in the closing stretch before the two dozen presidential nomination contests Tuesday. John McCain and Mitt Romney, top contenders for the GOP nomination, declined to participate in the forum. McCain answered questions solo at an MTV-MySpace forum from New Hampshire in December.

Obama, an Illinois senator, asked young voters concerned about America's place in the world to judge him on his record of standing against the Iraq war and on his background as the son of a Kenyan father and mother from Kansas. He noted his schooldays in Indonesia.

"If I convene a meeting of Muslim leaders to try to bridge the divide between Islam and the West, I do so with the credibility of someone who lived in a Muslim country for four years when I was a child," he said. "And although I'm a Christian I have a sense of that culture."

He said his supporters were diligently countering an anonymous e-mail campaign painting him as a Muslim, a faith he's never practiced.

"I am a member of the same Christian church where I've been for the last 20 years," he said. "I've been pledging allegiance to the flag since I was 3 years old. These are the old smear tactics that we see in every campaign."

Clinton, a New York senator, emphasized college affordability in response to a question, and outlined her proposals to help students pay off debt with national service, to increase Pell grants and to sweeten other college aid.

She said student loan companies should be cut out of the process and colleges should enter contracts with freshmen ensuring no tuition increases until they graduate.

"We are literally slamming the door of college in the face of so many young people," she said. Obama, too, talked about his national service plan to relieve college debt.

Huckabee, opening the forum, complained that he always gets "the God questions" when he'd rather be talking about public policy, and denied there's any conflict between his faith and the right things to do as president.

The former Baptist preacher was asked almost right off if he would be capable of making decisions in the Oval Office that might be at odds with his religion.

"There's not this glaring conflict," he said. "Faith helps me to understand what is right."

Religious conservatives have provided much of Huckabee's support and he's not been shy about courting them.

"I always get asked the God questions," he said, adding that "it's really been frustrating" that people don't want to know more about his work as Arkansas governor.

Paul told the forum he opposed U.S. intervention in Sudan's Darfur region and placed little faith in the ability of the United Nations to relieve the crisis there. He was asked what he'd do to stop the crisis from turning into a genocide on the scale of that experienced in Rwanda.

"I don't believe in using force in that manner," he said. "Under the Constitution, we're not allowed to do that."

He said he might support some interim aid, steered through international agencies, to address "these social problems in Africa." The U.N. estimates that 200,000 people have died and 2.5 million have been displaced since ethnic African rebels in Darfur took up arms against the Arab-dominated central government, accusing it of discrimination, in 2003

Huckabee spoke from Montgomery, Ala., and Paul from Victoria, Texas.

The forum, "Closing Arguments: A Presidential Super Dialogue," was presented live on MTV and more than 1,800 Web sites and radio stations. Questions came from moderators in MTV's Times Square studio and from online and in-studio participants.

---

Thankfully lots of young people took much more away from the forum than the AP did...too bad they are missing out:rolleyes: (can you say BLACKOUT!!?????).

Hackked
02-02-2008, 09:21 PM
WOW! Not even a blurb about anything he said. Makes me sick.

NoPants
02-02-2008, 09:23 PM
So that's what they saw? I must have been watching something else because what I saw was Dr. Paul owning that show!

pacelli
02-02-2008, 09:32 PM
Phillip Elliot covers democratic issues & events. This was a high-level democratically-oriented interview. The questions were democratic. I don't think anyone in the audience said that they were a republican. But a lot of people asking the questions referenced democrats.

That is probably why Mitt and McCain didn't show up to this MTV thing. They stand no chance against the dem's nominee. The only person who can win against the democratic nom is RON PAUL.

MayTheRonBeWithYou
02-02-2008, 10:20 PM
PHILLIP ELLIOTT = PHILLIP IDIOT

What a slanted piece.

pacelli
02-02-2008, 10:32 PM
PHILLIP ELLIOTT = PHILLIP IDIOT

What a slanted piece.

Democratic shill. Leaves out Dr. Paul because tonight's performance & polls proved to the dems that Ron Paul is going to be an unstoppable force.

RPinUptownChi
02-02-2008, 10:38 PM
i'm betting the guy that wrote that article didn't watch paul or huckabee speak. oh well i'm making 100 dvds tomorrow, the AP is bullshit news anyhow...

pacelli
02-02-2008, 10:41 PM
i'm betting the guy that wrote that article didn't watch paul or huckabee speak. oh well i'm making 100 dvds tomorrow, the AP is bullshit news anyhow...

Exactly. So it will be reported tomorrow as a democratic event and they'll give short name references to Huckabee and Paul. They'll mention something about what Huckabee said, but won't report on Paul's interview.

Edu
02-02-2008, 11:27 PM
"In youth forum, Obama says background helps him understand world, Clinton pitches college aid"

And no other candidate showed up.

Gifts for everyone! Get your handouts here! Vote for the socialist party today!

Free candy!

slantedview
02-02-2008, 11:40 PM
fuck the AP. what a ridiculous piece. they clearly cherrypicked the most somber thing paul had to say and avoided all of the positive stuff.

jesus christ, fuck them.

Ron2Win
02-02-2008, 11:43 PM
What a MFer:

"Paul told the forum he opposed U.S. intervention in Sudan's Darfur region and placed little faith in the ability of the United Nations to relieve the crisis there. He was asked what he'd do to stop the crisis from turning into a genocide on the scale of that experienced in Rwanda.

"I don't believe in using force in that manner," he said. "Under the Constitution, we're not allowed to do that."

RPinUptownChi
02-02-2008, 11:58 PM
he should've said something to the effect that we shouldn't be worrying about refugees in darfur when we can't even evacuate people out of the way of katrina...i liked his answer personally but kind of knew it wouldn't play well...

IDefendThePlatform
02-03-2008, 01:12 AM
The AP moron that wrote that can go to hell. Can we at least try to pretend that there is some unbiased reporting left? If not, let's just admit it and move on.

virginiakid
02-03-2008, 01:21 AM
I'm not a Ghandi person or subscribe to his religion, but his words ring true. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, and then you win! (Paraphrase).

They have laughed at us, they are ignoring us, and NOW they are starting to fight US. Victory is ours, and it is just around the corner. Never Give Up!

pacelli
02-03-2008, 01:59 AM
I'm not a Ghandi person or subscribe to his religion, but his words ring true. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, and then you win! (Paraphrase).

They have laughed at us, they are ignoring us, and NOW they are starting to fight US. Victory is ours, and it is just around the corner. Never Give Up!


I think they've been moving back and forth between ignoring, laughing, and fighting since the first debate. They switch it up from week to week as we catch on to their game and initiate operation: blowback.