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View Full Version : The adoption of Ron Paul ideas




Bern
01-25-2008, 09:18 AM
As I watched the first part of the "debate" last night, it struck me how much the candidates were echoing things Ron Paul has been saying from the beginning. It would be awesome if some proficient Youtuber could splice together footage of the debate with footage of Ron Paul at earlier debates (timelines all identified with subtitles).

For example, Rudy, of all people, said something to the effect that we needed to trade with China so that they would be less likely to attack us. It's from memory - I don't remember exactly - but the gist was that more trade = less chance of war. It's remarkable considering his disdain when Ron Paul said the same thing.

A lot of the candidates mentioned the borrowing money from China last night. Ron Paul was the only one talking about it previously.

MoneyWhereMyMouthIs2
01-25-2008, 09:20 AM
I personally wouldn't repeat their words, because I know it's just "lip service" coming from them. They aren't really adopting his ideas, just saying his words.

Bern
01-25-2008, 09:23 AM
The point is to show that Ron Paul's ideas are sound and popular. He is not as "kooky" as they have tried to portray him. We need to reach the older, republican base. This is an opportunity.

I would be interested to hear about any other issues people noticed the candidates adopting from Ron Paul's positions.

MoneyWhereMyMouthIs2
01-25-2008, 09:27 AM
Right, but if McCain is saying the same things as Paul, then why not vote for McCain? That's exactly what they're trying to do.

If anything, I'd rather see a video that shows them not understanding what they're saying, compared to Paul giving reasoned explanations.

realist
01-25-2008, 09:29 AM
I think we've all noticed this trend for some time. I'm concerned becuase the average voter doesn't know that these aren't their idea's their Ron Pauls ideas..... and Dr Paul is not calling attention to that when he has the opportunity.

reverse
01-25-2008, 09:48 AM
I heard Huck say 'Print more money', and I believe Paul was mocked by Fred Thompson after making that statement at a debate around a month ago. It was also interesting to hear another candidate actually say 'Borrow money from China' and hear phrases such as 'limited govt' and 'fiscal conservative' thrown around.

scooter
01-25-2008, 09:52 AM
They found out that a large portion of the conservative base will never vote for any of them if they don't address these issues. Unfortunately for them, we can see through the lip service.

jsgolfman
01-25-2008, 09:55 AM
I was thinking the same thing and even though he got one or two questions actualy asked of him, it was the same damn questions they have asked at each debate. They are afraid of him.

acptulsa
01-25-2008, 09:57 AM
They found out that a large portion of the conservative base will never vote for any of them if they don't address these issues. Unfortunately for them, we can see through the lip service.

The YouTube idea is a damned good one. Shows Ron Paul to be a true leader and paints all the rest as the flip-floppers that only Romney is widely known to be. Outstanding idea!

fmontez
01-25-2008, 10:00 AM
As I watched the first part of the "debate" last night, it struck me how much the candidates were echoing things Ron Paul has been saying from the beginning. It would be awesome if some proficient Youtuber could splice together footage of the debate with footage of Ron Paul at earlier debates (timelines all identified with subtitles).

For example, Rudy, of all people, said something to the effect that we needed to trade with China so that they would be less likely to attack us. It's from memory - I don't remember exactly - but the gist was that more trade = less chance of war. It's remarkable considering his disdain when Ron Paul said the same thing.

A lot of the candidates mentioned the borrowing money from China last night. Ron Paul was the only one talking about it previously.

Some of what you noticed is the Ron Paul Affect, but a lot of it is pretty common GOP talk... since the main issue has moved away from the war to the economy expect to here a lot more GOP lines.

RP's economic stance is similar in many aspects to the stated Republican platform of free trade, less taxes, and smaller government. So they are not really flipping.

enjerth
01-25-2008, 10:05 AM
I liked Giuliani's answer though about China. "They're at this level and we're at this level. They should buy from us." -------- WTF?

acptulsa
01-25-2008, 10:06 AM
Paul's economic stance is similar in many aspects to the stated Republican platform of free trade, less taxes, and smaller government. So they are not really flipping.

It's still damning if we can get some good footage of them saying what they ridiculed before. Very effective.

Bern
01-25-2008, 10:55 AM
I found Rudy's quote in the MSNBC transcript:
And the more America engages in trade, the more we get to know a country; the less likely we are to have military hostilities.

transcript (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22799665/page/10/)

You can't tell me that Mr. War, who openly mocked Ron Paul when he said the same damn thing in an earlier debate, is just echoing "pretty common GOP talk".

The importance of this statement in the context of the debate on non-interventionism by it's most ardent critic cannot be overstated IMO.

Voluntaryist
01-25-2008, 11:12 AM
I found Rudy's quote in the MSNBC transcript:

transcript (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22799665/page/10/)

You can't tell me that Mr. War, who openly mocked Ron Paul when he said the same damn thing in an earlier debate, is just echoing "pretty common GOP talk".

The importance of this statement in the context of the debate on non-interventionism by it's most ardent critic cannot be overstated IMO.

+111111000000000

MoneyWhereMyMouthIs2
01-25-2008, 01:53 PM
I liked Giuliani's answer though about China. "They're at this level and we're at this level. They should buy from us." -------- WTF?

I think Rudy actually made a good point there. (oh gawd... I can't believe I just said that.)

China's going to turn into a giant manufacturing engine, and one thing they'll need from us are efficient ways to deal with that... more advanced manufacturing processes and intellectual property such as software to run those systems. I don't think China has much respect for IP, though so I'm not really sure that goes anywhere. As far as selling them energy independence, which I think he mentioned specifically, we're not paying enough for energy to sell that to ourselves yet.